Route Filter Troubleshooting

Answered Question
Mar 1st, 2007

I have a route filter that I'm trying to implement. The idea is for local calls, to allow 10 digit dialing as long as the area code is 206 or 425. The user can also use 7-digit dialing as well.

I've configured the route filter as (AREA-CODE == 206) or (AREA-CODE == 425), and applied this to the route pattern 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX in the "LocalNumbers" partition. However, it seems to ignore the filter and the user can dial say 914087681234

I've tried using DNA to troubleshoot, and it does show it hitting that pattern in the correct partition but unfortunately I don't see the route filter information showing up.

Have I missed something here, or what's the best place to look? CCM 4.1(3)sr4b

I have this problem too.
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Correct Answer by fred.s.mollenkopf about 9 years 7 months ago

John,

Route Filters only apply to patterns with the NANP @ in them. Here is the CCM 4.1(3) blurb on it.

Route filters, along with route patterns/hunt pilots, use dialed-digit strings to determine how a call is handled. Route filters only apply when you configure a pattern that contains the at (@) wildcard. When the route pattern/hunt pilot contains the @ wildcard, Cisco CallManager routes calls according to the numbering plan that is specified in the Numbering Plan drop-down list box. The route filter window that Cisco CallManager displays varies according to the numbering plan that you select.

Route filters allow you to determine which route patterns/hunt pilots your users can dial; for example, whether your users can manually choose a long-distance carrier (by dialing 101 plus a carrier access code).

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/voice/c_callmg/4_1/sys_ad/4_1_3/ccmcfg/b03rtflt.htm

Please rate any helpful posts

Thanks

Fred

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Correct Answer
fred.s.mollenkopf Thu, 03/01/2007 - 12:24

John,

Route Filters only apply to patterns with the NANP @ in them. Here is the CCM 4.1(3) blurb on it.

Route filters, along with route patterns/hunt pilots, use dialed-digit strings to determine how a call is handled. Route filters only apply when you configure a pattern that contains the at (@) wildcard. When the route pattern/hunt pilot contains the @ wildcard, Cisco CallManager routes calls according to the numbering plan that is specified in the Numbering Plan drop-down list box. The route filter window that Cisco CallManager displays varies according to the numbering plan that you select.

Route filters allow you to determine which route patterns/hunt pilots your users can dial; for example, whether your users can manually choose a long-distance carrier (by dialing 101 plus a carrier access code).

http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/product/voice/c_callmg/4_1/sys_ad/4_1_3/ccmcfg/b03rtflt.htm

Please rate any helpful posts

Thanks

Fred

johnnylingo Thu, 03/01/2007 - 12:47

You're absolutely right. When I changed the pattern to 9.@ it worked exactly as expected.

johnnylingo Mon, 03/05/2007 - 15:33

The only problem is now I get a timeout when doing local 7-digit dialing (9.[2-9]XXXXXX)

To get around that, I'd like to require users dial 9 + 1. However, changing the pattern to 9.1@ breaks the filter again.

Any ideas? Or are 7-digit dialers just stuck?

rob.huffman Sat, 03/03/2007 - 09:15

Hey Fred,

You really nailed that answer. Great work! 5 points from this end. Keep it up!

Take care,

Rob

rob.huffman Thu, 03/01/2007 - 12:26

Hi John,

This may sound nuts :) but it sounds like route pattern 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX

Has "Route this pattern" checked instead of "Block this pattern".

Let us know,

Rob

mchandak Thu, 03/01/2007 - 12:43

Instead of using the option Area Code, you should use Local Area Code along with a 9.@ Pattern.

mchandak Thu, 03/01/2007 - 12:49

ok. Since it mentioned, 10 digit dial I thought it was without the '1'. Anyways, looks like the issue was resolved by using @ Pattern :)

johnnylingo Thu, 03/01/2007 - 14:12

Yes, I should have said "11 digit dialing" since I was requiring a 1 in front. Sorry :)

7aelahi Wed, 03/07/2007 - 15:45

When I do customer installs I always use 9.@ patterns with route filters. I've used this specific route filter for local 7 or 10 digit dialing.

(LONG-DISTANCE-OPERATIOR DOES-NOT-EXIST

AND INTERNATIONAL-ACCESS DOES-NOT-EXIST

AND TRANSIT-NETWORK-ESCAPE DOES-NOT-EXIST

AND LONG-DISTANCE-DIRECT-DIAL DOES NOT EXIST

AND AREA-CODE DOES-NOT-EXIST

AND LOCAL-AREA-CODE DOES-NOT-EXIST

AND OFFICE-CODE EXISTS

AND SUBSCRIBER EXISTS ) OR

(LOCAL-AREA-CODE == yyy)

* replace yyy with your specific area code

Of course you will have other 9.@ route patterns with route filters to specify 911, LD, and International dialing rules.

I find using route filters beneficial for a customer with multiple sites using a centralized call manager. I can re-use the same router filters applied to 9.@ patterns in different partitions.

Hope this helps.

johnnylingo Tue, 05/08/2007 - 12:21

Works great for 7 digit dialing and local area code + 7 digits, but what about 1 + local area code + 7 digits?

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