Converting a 1100 AP to LWAPP

Answered Question
Mar 8th, 2007

Hello,

is it possible to upgrade (or downgrade...) a 1100 ap to LWAPP and use them with a 4400 WLC ?

Thanks in advance.

Regards

Massimo

Correct Answer by Rob Huffman about 9 years 11 months ago

Hi Massimo,

It is possible to Upgrade an 1100 from Autonomous to LWAPP. Have a look;

The following Cisco Aironet access points have the ability to operate as autonomous access points or lightweight access points:

Cisco Aironet 1240 AG Series Access Points

Cisco Aironet 1230 AG Series Access Points

Cisco Aironet 1200 Series Access Points that contain 802.11g (AIR-MP21G-x-K9) and/or second-generation 802.11a radios (AIR-RM21A-x-K9 or AIR-RM22A-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1130 AG Series Access Points

Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Points that contain 802.11g radios (AIR-AP1121G-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Access Points/Bridges (AIR-BR1310G-x-K9 or AIR-BR1310G-x-K9-R). A Cisco Aironet 1300 Series operating in LWAPP mode only operates as an access point. This series does not support LWAPP bridging mode.

The LWAPP-capable access points listed above can be ordered configured for lightweight operation, ** or can be upgraded from autonomous access point mode to lightweight mode using the Autonomous to Lightweight Mode upgrade tool. Orderable access points configured for lightweight operation contain an "LAP" prefix in the part number, such as AIR-LAP1310G-x-K9. Orderable access points configured for autonomous operation contain the standard "AP" prefix, such as AIR-AP1242AG-x-K9, or "BR" in the case of AIR-BR1310G-x-K9.

All lightweight access points must be used with a Cisco wireless LAN controller. It is not possible for an access point that has been upgraded to LWAPP to operate independently.

The Cisco Aironet lightweight access points listed above are supported on the following controllers that have the requisite memory to hold the additional Cisco Aironet access point image bundles:

Cisco 2000 Series Wireless LAN Controllers

Cisco 4400 Series Wireless LAN Controllers

** An autonomous access point upgraded to operate as a lightweight access point can be converted back to an autonomous access point.

From this good doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6521/prod_bulletin0900aecd80321a2c.html

Cisco has released a free tool called the "Autonomous to Lightweight Mode Upgrade Tool" that allows selected Cisco Aironet autonomous access point models to be configured for lightweight mode operation. This tool is available for downloading from the Cisco Software Center.

The Autonomous to Lightweight Mode Upgrade Tool supports the following models:

Cisco Aironet 1240AG Series access points

Cisco Aironet 1230AG Series access points

Cisco Aironet 1200 Series access points that contain 802.11g (AIR-MP21G-x-K9) and/or second-generation 802.11a radios (AIR-RM21A-x-K9 or AIR-RM22A-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1130AG Series access points

Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Points that contain 802.11g radios (AIR-AP1121G-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Access Points/Bridges (AIR-BR1310G-x-K9 or AIR-BR1310G-x-K9-R). A Cisco Aironet 1300 Series operating in Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP) mode only operates as an access point. This series does not support LWAPP bridging mode.

The Autonomous to Lightweight Mode Upgrade Tool supports a process to migrate an autonomous access point from autonomous mode to lightweight mode.In converted access points operating in lightweight mode, Cisco IOS Software continues to run on the access point, while LWAPP is used to communicate with a wireless LAN controller. Since LWAPP supports automatic access point configuration, there is no need to retain or convert the original autonomous Cisco IOS Software access point configuration.

For more information on upgrading Cisco Aironet autonomous access points to LWAPP, please read the Cisco Aironet Access Point Support for Lightweight Access Point Protocol Product Bulletin or Upgrading Autonomous Cisco Aironet Access Points to Lightweight Mode Deployment Guide.

From this good doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps4570/products_white_paper0900aecd804f1a23.shtml

Hope this helps!

Rob

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Correct Answer
Rob Huffman Thu, 03/08/2007 - 05:47

Hi Massimo,

It is possible to Upgrade an 1100 from Autonomous to LWAPP. Have a look;

The following Cisco Aironet access points have the ability to operate as autonomous access points or lightweight access points:

Cisco Aironet 1240 AG Series Access Points

Cisco Aironet 1230 AG Series Access Points

Cisco Aironet 1200 Series Access Points that contain 802.11g (AIR-MP21G-x-K9) and/or second-generation 802.11a radios (AIR-RM21A-x-K9 or AIR-RM22A-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1130 AG Series Access Points

Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Points that contain 802.11g radios (AIR-AP1121G-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Access Points/Bridges (AIR-BR1310G-x-K9 or AIR-BR1310G-x-K9-R). A Cisco Aironet 1300 Series operating in LWAPP mode only operates as an access point. This series does not support LWAPP bridging mode.

The LWAPP-capable access points listed above can be ordered configured for lightweight operation, ** or can be upgraded from autonomous access point mode to lightweight mode using the Autonomous to Lightweight Mode upgrade tool. Orderable access points configured for lightweight operation contain an "LAP" prefix in the part number, such as AIR-LAP1310G-x-K9. Orderable access points configured for autonomous operation contain the standard "AP" prefix, such as AIR-AP1242AG-x-K9, or "BR" in the case of AIR-BR1310G-x-K9.

All lightweight access points must be used with a Cisco wireless LAN controller. It is not possible for an access point that has been upgraded to LWAPP to operate independently.

The Cisco Aironet lightweight access points listed above are supported on the following controllers that have the requisite memory to hold the additional Cisco Aironet access point image bundles:

Cisco 2000 Series Wireless LAN Controllers

Cisco 4400 Series Wireless LAN Controllers

** An autonomous access point upgraded to operate as a lightweight access point can be converted back to an autonomous access point.

From this good doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6521/prod_bulletin0900aecd80321a2c.html

Cisco has released a free tool called the "Autonomous to Lightweight Mode Upgrade Tool" that allows selected Cisco Aironet autonomous access point models to be configured for lightweight mode operation. This tool is available for downloading from the Cisco Software Center.

The Autonomous to Lightweight Mode Upgrade Tool supports the following models:

Cisco Aironet 1240AG Series access points

Cisco Aironet 1230AG Series access points

Cisco Aironet 1200 Series access points that contain 802.11g (AIR-MP21G-x-K9) and/or second-generation 802.11a radios (AIR-RM21A-x-K9 or AIR-RM22A-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1130AG Series access points

Cisco Aironet 1100 Series Access Points that contain 802.11g radios (AIR-AP1121G-x-K9)

Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Access Points/Bridges (AIR-BR1310G-x-K9 or AIR-BR1310G-x-K9-R). A Cisco Aironet 1300 Series operating in Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP) mode only operates as an access point. This series does not support LWAPP bridging mode.

The Autonomous to Lightweight Mode Upgrade Tool supports a process to migrate an autonomous access point from autonomous mode to lightweight mode.In converted access points operating in lightweight mode, Cisco IOS Software continues to run on the access point, while LWAPP is used to communicate with a wireless LAN controller. Since LWAPP supports automatic access point configuration, there is no need to retain or convert the original autonomous Cisco IOS Software access point configuration.

For more information on upgrading Cisco Aironet autonomous access points to LWAPP, please read the Cisco Aironet Access Point Support for Lightweight Access Point Protocol Product Bulletin or Upgrading Autonomous Cisco Aironet Access Points to Lightweight Mode Deployment Guide.

From this good doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps4570/products_white_paper0900aecd804f1a23.shtml

Hope this helps!

Rob

reginald-pugh Wed, 03/14/2007 - 16:40

Hi Wireless Wizards,

Running into a problem converting a WAP that was purchased with LWAPP installed not IOS.

Is it possible, while using a TFTP server to convert this AIR-LAP1131AG to IOS autonomous mode?

Or do you need a controller?

I keep getting timeouts--- on the TFTP transfer using the steps recommended in the whitepaper.

I disabled the firewalls as well, still the same thing. Image won't take to the AP.

Thanks

Rob Huffman Thu, 03/15/2007 - 06:28

Hi Reginald,

This conversion back to IOS is possible (it sounds like a TFTP problem here);

Reverting the Access Point Back to Autonomous Mode

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/prod_technical_reference09186a00804fc3dc.html#wp161272

Have a look at the details in the following threads that all have to do with TFTP. There are some great hints for troubleshooting TFTP problems from some of my favourite NetPros like ScottMac,Stephen from Cisco and Jack Young. The likely culprit may be that you need to uncheck "hide extensions for known file types" on your TFTP server;

http://forum.cisco.com/eforum/servlet/NetProf?page=netprof&forum=Wireless%20-%20Mobility&topic=WLAN%20Radio%20Standards&CommCmd=MB%3Fcmd%3Dpass_through%26location%3Doutline%40%5E1%40%40.1ddc042b/8#selected_message

http://forum.cisco.com/eforum/servlet/NetProf?page=netprof&forum=Wireless%20-%20Mobility&topic=General&CommCmd=MB%3Fcmd%3Dpass_through%26location%3Doutline%40%5E1%40%40.1ddc03c4/2#selected_message

http://forum.cisco.com/eforum/servlet/NetProf?page=netprof&forum=Wireless%20-%20Mobility&topic=General&CommCmd=MB%3Fcmd%3Dpass_through%26location%3Doutline%40%5E1%40%40.1ddbf271

Hope this helps! Good Luck!

Rob

reginald-pugh Sun, 03/18/2007 - 09:13

Hi Rob,

This topic should have read LWAPP to IOS not IOS to LWAPP. I trust you can go IOS to LWAPP and back to IOS.

We purchased a WAP with strictly LWAPP and need to convert to IOS. I am thinking, we should have purchased a IOS WAP and the conversion would be much easier.

I read the FAQs and it mentions nothing about purchasing a LWAPP AP and trying to go to IOS with a TFTP server.

If it does it is very vague , because it starts of with IOS WAPs to LWAPP WAPs then reverting them back to IOS WAPs

My take it assumes you have already had IOS on the AP and need to revert from LWAPP back to IOS.

The TFTP files did show up before, I read these helpful pdfs and there were no hidden files

The timeout, is still happening regardless of the TFTP server I use. I follow the steps. The LWAPP image remains on the WAP.

I can console with the console cable into the WAP and see the LWAPP discovery image test files, but when I go into TFTP mode, with the the ethernet port, to to try upgrade/downgrade to IOS...it just won't budge. The LWAPP image remains and the IOS won't take.

I have reada tech forum that gives conflicting advice.... some that state the controller is necessary if you purchase a LWAPP imaged AP and need to go to IOS.

Then some say it is not.

http://www.techsoup.org/fb/index.cfm?fuseaction=forums.showSingleTopic&id=63333&forum=2040&cid=117

Last post makes me think it is not possible:

Has anyone ever purchased a LWAPP imaged WAP and converted it to IOS, without the controller?

Thanks

Rob Huffman Mon, 03/19/2007 - 06:03

Hi Reginald,

I have worked with others here on the forum that purchased LWAPP AP's and really needed IOS and they were able to convert them using this TFTP method and not using the WLC. (any problems they had were always associated to TFTP not the process itself)

The AP can be converted back to Autonomous (IOS) using the following method;

Reverting the Access Point Back to Autonomous Mode

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/prod_technical_reference09186a00804fc3dc.html#wp161272

Converting a Lightweight Access Point Back to Autonomous Mode

You can convert an access point from lightweight mode back to autonomous mode by loading a Cisco IOS Release that supports autonomous mode (Cisco IOS release 12.3(7)JA or earlier). If the access point is associated to a controller, you can use the controller to load the Cisco IOS release. If the access point is not associated to a controller, you can load the Cisco IOS release using TFTP.

Using a TFTP Server to Return to a Previous Release

Follow these steps to revert from LWAPP mode to autonomous mode by loading a Cisco IOS release using a TFTP server:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Step 1 The static IP address of the PC on which your TFTP server software runs should be between 10.0.0.2 and 10.0.0.30.

Step 2 Make sure that the PC contains the access point image file (such as c1200-k9w7-tar.122-15.JA.tar for a 1200 series access point) in the TFTP server folder and that the TFTP server is activated.

Step 3 Rename the access point image file in the TFTP server folder to c1200-k9w7-tar.default for a 1200 series access point, c1130-k9w7-tar.default for an 1130 series access point, and c1240-k9w7-tar.default for a 1240 series access point.

Step 4 Connect the PC to the access point using a Category 5 (CAT5) Ethernet cable.

Step 5 Disconnect power from the access point.

Step 6 Press and hold MODE while you reconnect power to the access point.

Step 7 Hold the MODE button until the status LED turns red (approximately 20 to 30 seconds) and then release.

Step 8 Wait until the access point reboots, as indicated by all LEDs turning green followed by the Status LED blinking green.

Step 9 After the access point reboots, reconfigure it using the GUI or the CLI.

From this doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/prod_technical_reference09186a00804fc3dc.html#wp161272

Hope this helps!

Rob

m.maiorino Thu, 03/15/2007 - 00:50

Thanks Rob!

Following your helps I've been able to upgrade the 1100 AP to an LWAPP.

I 've tested the "roll-back" (LWAPP -> Autonomous AP) with success too.

Thanks again.

Have a nice day!

Massimo

Rob Huffman Thu, 03/15/2007 - 06:11

Hi Massimo,

You are most welcome!

Great job! Thanks for letting us know how you made out with this :)

You have a great day as well,

Rob

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