Route Filters

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lfulgenzi Sun, 05/27/2007 - 04:40
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Route filters are one way of building up the route patterns for your dial plan. Personally, I like using them rather than trying to come up with multiple route patterns using the wildcards in order to get what I need.


For example, say you wanted to route all calls to area code 222 and office codes 345 and 678 to a specific gateway for toll bypass. You would need to create two route patterns to do this, namely, 222345xxxx and 222678xxxx. However, if you created a route filter that had the following clauses: (area-code is 222 and office code is 345) or (area-code is 222 and office code is 678) you would then create one route pattern, 9.@ with the route filter attached.


There is a strong following for each, and I'm sure people could come up with reasons to use one over the other. One big argument against 9.@ and route filters is that it actually expands the route patterns into the system memory where as a route pattern with wild cards continues to include the wild card in memory. For example, if you wanted area code 222 and office codes 301 - 399, your route filter would have 99 clauses in it and therefore would have 99 route patterns loaded into memory (you would see an exact match in the trace files to each office code). If you used wildcards and created a route pattern with 2223xxxxxx, the system would only insert one route pattern into memory.


The one thing to remember is that you can only use route patterns with the @ macro.


Let us know if this helps.


Lelio


P.S. Consequesntly, the 0.@ you see is just a different off-net access code. It could be just about any digit the office wants to use.



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