Route Filter Question - How to force users to dial 9 + 1 + 10 Digits

Answered Question
May 29th, 2007

Is there a way in a route filter to detect/force the user to dial a 1 after the 9 for all long distance numbers?


Currently, our route patterns are 9.@, using route filters to block 900, 976, etc. One problem is the user can dial 9 + 10 Digits, and the call will go out to the PSTN. I would like to force them to dial 9 + 1 + 10 Digits for Long Distance calls.

Correct Answer by lfulgenzi about 9 years 9 months ago

You can definately achieve this, but you'll have to plan out your dial plan in order to get the right combination of filters to get what you want.


For example, as you see from your example above, the 9.@ route patterns allows everything. By adding a route filter, you only allow or deny access based on matched clauses. Checking the 'block this route pattern' is what I mean by denying.


So, at a minimum, you need one 9.@ route patterns which allows everything and one 9.@ route pattern with a filter that denies something.


The more precise the match will take precedence.


Assuming you want to get rid of all local 10 digit dialing, you can create another 9.@ route pattern with a route filter that has "local area code exists" and block that route pattern. Or you could just add it to the filter you already have. The local area code predicate (that's what I call it) refers to any area code that exists whenever there is no 0 or 1 in front of it. As soon as there is a 1 or 0, then it is an area code, not a local area code.


If you eventually want some local 10 digit dialing, you can just create another route pattern 9.@ with the appropriate filter and make sure to route that pattern. Or you can simplify things by using 9.123xxxxxxx, replacing 123 with your local area code.


Just to throw a wrinkle into things, the SRNDs talk about the 'device/line approach' which basically says you give the device access to all dialing and use 'deny' on the line's calling search space to restrict offnet dialing. This is very important for extension mobility to ensure that the person logging in has the same class of service whereever they go.


Let us know if that helps, if not, post back.


Lelio



Please rate posts if they help.


  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Overall Rating: 4 (1 ratings)
Loading.
Correct Answer
lfulgenzi Tue, 05/29/2007 - 14:59

You can definately achieve this, but you'll have to plan out your dial plan in order to get the right combination of filters to get what you want.


For example, as you see from your example above, the 9.@ route patterns allows everything. By adding a route filter, you only allow or deny access based on matched clauses. Checking the 'block this route pattern' is what I mean by denying.


So, at a minimum, you need one 9.@ route patterns which allows everything and one 9.@ route pattern with a filter that denies something.


The more precise the match will take precedence.


Assuming you want to get rid of all local 10 digit dialing, you can create another 9.@ route pattern with a route filter that has "local area code exists" and block that route pattern. Or you could just add it to the filter you already have. The local area code predicate (that's what I call it) refers to any area code that exists whenever there is no 0 or 1 in front of it. As soon as there is a 1 or 0, then it is an area code, not a local area code.


If you eventually want some local 10 digit dialing, you can just create another route pattern 9.@ with the appropriate filter and make sure to route that pattern. Or you can simplify things by using 9.123xxxxxxx, replacing 123 with your local area code.


Just to throw a wrinkle into things, the SRNDs talk about the 'device/line approach' which basically says you give the device access to all dialing and use 'deny' on the line's calling search space to restrict offnet dialing. This is very important for extension mobility to ensure that the person logging in has the same class of service whereever they go.


Let us know if that helps, if not, post back.


Lelio



Please rate posts if they help.


johnnylingo Tue, 05/29/2007 - 15:10

Ah...of course. I had been trying to use Country-Code == 1 and that didn't seem to work. So I have two route patterns for Long Distance:


9.@ w/ Route Filter allowing

9.@ w/ Route Filter blocking


The blocking route filter has AREA-CODE == 900 or AREA-CODE == 976 and so on. The allowing route filter has AREA-CODE EXISTS. This works great.

Actions

This Discussion