static and default routes

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Aug 6th, 2007
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If i have R1 which has a LAN behind it and he is connected to R2 that connects to the internet => why is it necessary for R1 to have a static default route to the internet? why cant it have RIP or some other interior routing protocol?

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Jon Marshall Mon, 08/06/2007 - 12:52
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Hi


You could run a routing protocol between R1 & r2 but you would still need a default route for the Internet, unless you want to enter routes for every single network available on the internet.


So you could run RIP between R1 & R2 and have a default route on R2 and propogate it via RIP to R1 but it is bit of overkill for 2 routers.


HTH


Jon

Richard Burts Mon, 08/06/2007 - 12:55
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Oren


If you have R1 which has a LAN and is connected to R2 you may CHOOSE to have a static default route. But it certainly is NOT required. It is entirely possible to run a dynamic routing protocol (RIP, or OSPF, or EIGRP, etc) and to have R1 learn the default route dynamically.


HTH


Rick

milkdroogy Mon, 08/06/2007 - 13:28
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Thanks Rick.

but what is the better and preferred option?

Richard Burts Mon, 08/06/2007 - 18:49
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Oren


There is not a single or simple answer about which is better and preferred. What is the better and preferred option will depend on your individual environment and how you establish your criteria for better or preferred. For some the simplicity of a static default route will make that better. For some not consuming any bandwidth on the link between routers with dynamic routing protocol traffic (hello messages, routing updates, etc) will make the static default better. For some being sure that the route to outside is really valid (so you do not waste bandwidth sending packets to the remote router which it will drop because the destination is not reachable) means that a dynamic routing protocol is better.


For many people with just 2 routers the simplicity and lack of overhead traffic will make the static default better. As the network grows in size and complexity the balance tends to shift toward dynamic routing protocol. When the network begins to have multiple paths toward a destination and you want the ability to know if the primary path is no longer useable so that you can shift to the backup path dynamically then the better choice is dynamic routing protocol.


So where in that scale is your particular environment?


HTH


Rick

milkdroogy Tue, 08/07/2007 - 02:51
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Thanks again Rick.

i understand now.

i have no real physical environment, i'm just studying for my CCNA-ICND exam and want to make sure that i understand all the details and minorities.

Richard Burts Tue, 08/07/2007 - 05:52
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Oren


No Problem.


The forum is a good place to learn things and to ask questions about things that you do not understand. I encourage you to continue your participation in the forum.


Good luck with your studies.


HTH


Rick

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