as a network engineer, how would you mesaure your position?

Unanswered Question
Aug 14th, 2007

im not sure if im in the right group to start this conversation.....my manager came up to me and asked "as a network engineer, how would you measure your position/group"?...basically, its a question about how do i know if your doing your job without any metrics to compare too....

if anybody has their metrics to share i would greatly appriciate...

thanks

I have this problem too.
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avmabe Fri, 08/24/2007 - 06:14

Metrics... Network uptime and quality is a good start. Install some tools to do graphing so you can print them out and show how good the network is operating.

Everybody likes graphs.

scottmac Sun, 11/25/2007 - 06:45

Network availabillity is right up there (as mentioned earlier).

Other things people tend to look at are things like response to network problems, which are frequently tracked by using an internal ticketing system.

Most ticketing systems give you metrics like "Mean Time to Repair/Resolution", How long it took to begin resolution action, and all of the other stats related to getting a user's request taken care of.

The side benefit of a ticketing system is that everything is documented, including the manpower required, to support requests from your department that you need more resources, training, or manpower.

Since network maintenance is essentially a customer service (the network users are your customers), satisfaction surveys might be a good indicator of how you are doing versus how you think you are doing.

It also offers a chance to ask the users for suggestions. Users tend be to a little warmer & fluffier when they think they have some input into the operation. THe downside is that they tend to ask for things that will kill the security of the network ... be prepared to defend your policies.

Other things to look at are related to routine maintenance and things like security updates. Both are pretty mundane, but without the time spent to get the updates and apply them, the network is at-risk.

If some reasonable comparison can be made against what updates are available, versus what updates have already been applied, it might be a reasonable metric to include.

Some points should also be given for research / investigation of new applications, technologies, or resources that will make the network more stable, secure or perform better (and / or makes the user's experience better, the operating costs lower, more managable without needing to add more staff, etc.).

There are a lot of areas on which you can be evaluated, most are extensions of how the network performs, and the user's experience.

Pick the top five things you do the most (don't forget the routine-but-necessary) and think of a way to measure them objectively.

Good Luck

Scott

szajihsaniatan Tue, 11/27/2007 - 06:39

good points...we did look at MTTR, but that measurement is more for the Operations/NOC...as for Engineers, I think your last 2 comments would be the best to measure a Engineer position: "Some points should also be given for research / investigation of new applications, technologies, or resources that will make the network more stable, secure or perform better (and / or makes the user's experience better, the operating costs lower, more managable without needing to add more staff, etc.).

There are a lot of areas on which you can be evaluated, most are extensions of how the network performs, and the user's experience. "...

Thanks for all the reponses...

ccbootcamp Mon, 11/26/2007 - 22:39

Show/document the lack (hopefully) of downtime. Show/document timeliness of response to issues. Get some "networking certs."

How well is your network documented? Do you have a security process/procedure inplace to handle attacks/response to attacks? What type of tools are you using to measure your network performance and availability?

And last, if the above doesn't work and he/she doesn't appreciate you, start looking for a new job! :)

-brad

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