16 port network module in a 2811 ISR

Answered Question

I have a 16 port Ethernet module in a 2811 and when I do a show inventory I see it

"NME-16ES-1G-P: EtherSwitch SM 16 10/100T PoE + 1 GE"

However, if I try to look a specific interfaces, I see the Gig 1/0 port on this card, but cannot see any of the FastE ports to configure, etc?

Do I have to access this module separately to configure them?

Sorry, I haven't touched a Cisco device in 8 years and while we're hiring a new network engineer, I'm helping out.

Correct Answer by rebecca.richards about 9 years 5 months ago

We use the NME-16ES-1G-P modules in some of our 2811 routers, and they're great! The weird bit is working out the internal "wiring", as the module is it's own little entity, with its own IOS image and configuration.

If you treat the NME-16ES module as a separate switch, it's connected to the router through the Gi1/0 network interface. This virtual network cable is connected to the switch on interface Gi1/0/2.

In order to connect to the CLI in the module, give the Gi1/0 interface an IP address, and use the following command:

rtr# service-module gi1/0 session

The configuration of the switch is the same as any other switch.

I have set up vlan trunks between the router and switch, by creating sub-interfaces on the router's Gi1/0 port, and specifying the vlan for each sub-interface.

rtr# int gi1/0.100

descr ** Data VLAN**

encap dot1q 100

ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

rtr# int gi1/0.110

descr ** Voice VLAN **

encap dot1q 110

ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0

On the NME-16ES card, the "default-gateway" is the IP address of the gi1/0 interface, and the gi1/0/2 (Virtual) interface configuration is simple:

sw# int gi1/0/2

switchport trunk encap dot1q

switchport mode trunk

The Gig port on the module is Gi1/0/1. The switch ports on the module are fa1/0/1 to 16. You can do everything on the module just like you would on a normal switch, including QoS.

I've successfully set up 2811+NME-16ES modules for VoIP support + SRST etc...

In the end, it's a very compact, neat solution, though limited to 16 ports.

What you have there is an EtherSwitch Service Module and that's different than the EtherSwitch Network Module. This is why the interfaces do not appear in the router's IOS. The ESM is actually a little cat3750 stuck in the router and is actually treated like a separate switch, it even has its own code.

The gigabit connection you're seeing is the one that connects the router to the ESM. You might start with the Q&A and then hit the feature guide for instructions on accessing the module:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps5855/products_qanda_item0900aecd8028d16a.shtml

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/modules/ps2797/products_feature_guide09186a0080415bae.html#wp1820423

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Correct Answer

What you have there is an EtherSwitch Service Module and that's different than the EtherSwitch Network Module. This is why the interfaces do not appear in the router's IOS. The ESM is actually a little cat3750 stuck in the router and is actually treated like a separate switch, it even has its own code.

The gigabit connection you're seeing is the one that connects the router to the ESM. You might start with the Q&A and then hit the feature guide for instructions on accessing the module:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps5855/products_qanda_item0900aecd8028d16a.shtml

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/modules/ps2797/products_feature_guide09186a0080415bae.html#wp1820423

Correct Answer
rebecca.richards Tue, 09/11/2007 - 19:39

We use the NME-16ES-1G-P modules in some of our 2811 routers, and they're great! The weird bit is working out the internal "wiring", as the module is it's own little entity, with its own IOS image and configuration.

If you treat the NME-16ES module as a separate switch, it's connected to the router through the Gi1/0 network interface. This virtual network cable is connected to the switch on interface Gi1/0/2.

In order to connect to the CLI in the module, give the Gi1/0 interface an IP address, and use the following command:

rtr# service-module gi1/0 session

The configuration of the switch is the same as any other switch.

I have set up vlan trunks between the router and switch, by creating sub-interfaces on the router's Gi1/0 port, and specifying the vlan for each sub-interface.

rtr# int gi1/0.100

descr ** Data VLAN**

encap dot1q 100

ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0

rtr# int gi1/0.110

descr ** Voice VLAN **

encap dot1q 110

ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0

On the NME-16ES card, the "default-gateway" is the IP address of the gi1/0 interface, and the gi1/0/2 (Virtual) interface configuration is simple:

sw# int gi1/0/2

switchport trunk encap dot1q

switchport mode trunk

The Gig port on the module is Gi1/0/1. The switch ports on the module are fa1/0/1 to 16. You can do everything on the module just like you would on a normal switch, including QoS.

I've successfully set up 2811+NME-16ES modules for VoIP support + SRST etc...

In the end, it's a very compact, neat solution, though limited to 16 ports.

cdvnet Thu, 01/31/2008 - 07:17

Hi.i'm doing the same but a "sh int giga 1/0/2 counters" command shows many UnderSize.

Do you get the same ?

Regards

dmitrybarsky Mon, 02/11/2008 - 19:44

With regard to the gi1/0 port, then will it essentially have three IP addresses right? The whole interface gi1/0 will have an IP that will be used to session into the attached switch, Likewise gi1/0 will also have two sub-interfaces (gi1/0.100 & gi1/0.110) for their respective VLANs?

I'm sorry if my question above seems unclear, essentially what I am wondering is whether the gi1/0 port needs to have a primary IP address in addition to the subinterface addresses in order to manage the attached switch.

Thanks,

~barsky

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