Converting a LAP1310G back to IOS

Unanswered Question
Sep 26th, 2007

I hve a customer who has purchased two 1310 bridges in lightweight mode and wants to convert them to IOS. Has anyone managed to accomplish this.

I have this problem too.
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rob.huffman Wed, 09/26/2007 - 06:42

Hi Barry,

I have not tried this myself, but here are two possible methods to return the 1310 to IOS.

You can convert an access point from lightweight mode back to autonomous mode by loading a Cisco IOS Release that supports autonomous mode (Cisco IOS release 12.3(7)JA or earlier). If the access point is associated to a controller, you can use the controller to load the Cisco IOS release. If the access point is not associated to a controller, you can load the Cisco IOS release using TFTP.

Revert from LWAPP mode to autonomous mode using a wireless LAN controller:

Step 1 Log into the CLI on the controller to which the access point is associated.

Step 2 Enter this command:

config ap tftp-downgrade tftp-server-ip-address filename access-point-name

Aironet 1300 Series Bridges do not have a MODE button to reset the AP to factory defaults. So, if neither the GUI or CLI is available with sufficient privileges, complete these steps to delete the current configuration and return the entire bridge settings to the factory defaults using the CLI.

Open the CLI with a Telnet session or a connection to the bridge console port.

Reboot the bridge by removing and reapplying power.

Allow the bridge to boot until the command prompt appears and the bridge begins to inflate the image.

Press ESC when you see lines that are similar to these on the CLI:

Loading "flash:/c1310-k9kw-7mx.v122_15_ja.200040314-k9w7-mx.v122_15_ja.20040314"

...#############################################################################Note: In order to access the boot loader, you must press ESC twice. But this action depends on the terminal-emulation software that you use.

Messages that are similar to these appear:

Error loading "flash:/c1310-k9kw-7mx.v122_15_ja.200040314-k9w7-mx.v122_15_

ja.20040314"

Interrupt within 5 seconds to abort boot process.

Boot process terminated.

The system is unable to boot automatically. The BOOT environment variable needs to

be set to a bootable image.

C1310 Boot Loader (C1310-BOOT-M), Version 12.2 [BLD-v122_15-ja_throttle.20040314 100]

bridge:At the bridge: prompt, issue the dir flash: command in order to view a directory of the Flash file system.

The directory is similar to this directory:

bridge: dir flash:

Directory of flash:/

2 -rwx 0 env_vars

5 drwx 384 C1310-k9w7-mx.v133_15_JA.20040314

3 -rwx 1128 config.txt

4 -rwx 5 private-config

3693568 bytes available (4047872 bytes used)

bridge:Delete or rename the files config.txt and env_vars, and reboot the bridge.

Note: Do not forget the / character before the filenames.

bridge: delete flash:config.txt

Are you sure you want to delete flash:/config.txt (y/n)?y

File "flash:/config.txt" deleted

bridge: delete flash:/env_vars

Are you sure you want to delete "flash:/env_vars" (y/n)?y

File "flash:/env_vars" deletedIssue the boot command in order to reboot the bridge at the bridge: prompt, or simply power cycle the bridge.

After the bridge reboots, reconfigure the bridge with the web browser interface, the Telnet interface, or Cisco IOS Software commands.

Note: The bridge is configured with the factory default values that include:

The IP address, which is set to receive an IP address with DHCP. If you do not have a DHCP server, you can access the bridge using the default IP address of 10.0.0.1 using HTTP/HTTPS or Telnet. Once you gain access to the bridge via Telnet or GUI, you can modify the IP address of the bridge.

Note: This default IP address of 10.0.0.1 becomes available only for a short period. So, make sure that you assign your own IP address to the bridge within that period of time.

The default username and password, "Cisco".

From this doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_password_recovery09186a00800949d0.shtml#ca_1310_ser

Hope this helps!

Rob

rob.huffman Mon, 10/08/2007 - 07:18

Hi Doug,

I hate to say it but I don't think that there is any way without a WLC. I did some more research recently on this issue and the problem is due to the fact that the 1300 Series do not have a " Mode Button". Here is a clip;

Aironet 1300 Series Bridges do not have a MODE button to reset the AP to factory defaults

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_password_recovery09186a00800949d0.shtml#ca_1310_ser

Returning the Access Point to Autonomous Mode

You can return a lightweight access point to autonomous mode by loading a Cisco IOS release that supports autonomous mode (such as Cisco IOS Release 12.3(8)JA or earlier). When the access point is associated to a controller, you can use the controller to load the Cisco IOS release.

Using a Controller to Return the Access Point to Autonomous Mode

Follow these steps to return a lightweight access point to autonomous mode using a controller:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Step 1 Log into the CLI on the controller to which the access point is associated and enter this command:

config ap tftp-downgrade tftp-server-ip-address filename access-point-name

(where:

a) tftp-server-ip-address is the IP address of the TFTP server

b) filename is the full path and filename of the access point image file, such as D:/Images/c1310-k9w7-tar.123-8.JA.tar

c) access-point-name is the name that identifies the access point on the controller.)

Step 2 Wait until the access point completes the reboot.

Step 3 After the access point reboots, reconfigure it using the access point GUI or the CLI. For additional information refer to the Cisco Aironet 1300 Series Outdoor Access Point Hardware Installation Guide available at this URL:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/tsd_products_support_category_home.html

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/access_point/1300/installation/guide/130h_c5.html#wp1076073

Hope this helps! I know it is not what you wanted to hear.

Rob

I think your best bet is to contact Cisco and trade these models in for the IOS Version.

Rob,

After a little more patience, I found a way to do this, It seems that you can do it by TFTP from ROMMON, but after settign the variables, I was unable to work out the command line string from the ROMMON copy command. I did achieve this using xmodem.

As Bridge boots up, Press esc to break into ROMMON

Extract the IOS image from the TAR file on the local PC and copy onto the bridge via xmodem (yes it will take a while, you can change the baud rate, but do this with care as there is no telnet access in LWAPP mode if you get this wrong)

bridge: copy xmodem: flash:c1310-k9w7-mx.123-11.JA4

Boot the new image file from ROMMON

bridge: boot flash:c1310-k9w7-mx.123-11.JA4

The AP will boot up with the autonomous OS, to copy the WEB files on also, do the following

Connect to TFTP server and Configure IP settings as below

AP# erase flash:

AP# archive download /overwrite /force-reload tftp://10.2.1.1/c1310-k9w7-tar.123-11.JA4.tar

The bridge will reboot with the full Autonomous OS

interface Dot11Radio0

no ip address

bridge-group 1

bridge-group 1 spanning-disabled

!

interface FastEthernet0

no ip address

bridge-group 1

no bridge-group 1 source-learning

bridge-group 1 spanning-disabled

!

interface BVI1

ip address 10.2.1.10 255.255.255.0

no ip route-cache

!

bridge 1 route ip

rob.huffman Sat, 12/22/2007 - 09:42

Hi Doug,

Thanks for posting back with this resolution, great work! 5 points for sharing this with the rest of the community here :)

Happy Holidays!

Rob

olympicridge Thu, 12/11/2008 - 17:48

I tried this method but get an I/O error like this:

bridge: copy xmodem: flash:c1310-k9w7-tar.124-10b.JDA2.tar

Begin the Xmodem or Xmodem-1K transfer now...

CCCCCCCCCCBB0BB0xmodem:: I/O error

I have tried it many different ways, my baud rate is 9600, Any ideas?

Gordon

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