VLAN & unknown unicast

Answered Question
Oct 1st, 2007

which ports does a switch forward a unkown unicast or multicast frame when there are several vlans spanned over several switches?

Lets say a switch received a unknowns unicast frame on a port that is part of vlan 20, this switch has several vlans, some other switches connected on trunks and also a router. So will this switch forward the frame on all vlan 20 ports on this switch and on the trunk ports as well?

thanks for your help.

I have this problem too.
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Correct Answer by Kevin Dorrell about 9 years 2 months ago

Yes, for an unknown unicast, the switch will forward the frame to all ports on the VLAN, including any trunks, unless the port is in Spanning Tree blocking state, or unless the trunk does not have the VLAN on its "allowed" list.

For an unknown multicast, the situation is slightly different. If it is an IP multicast (but not in the range 224.0.0.x), and you have IGMP snooping or CGMP enabled on the switch, then the frame is only forwarded to those hosts that have actually expressed an interest in that multicast by sending an IGMP report for that address.

Kevin Dorrell

Luxembourg

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paul.matthews Mon, 10/01/2007 - 23:58

Broadcast, multicast (when not constrained by IGMP Snooping or CGMP) and unknown unicast will be forwarded oout of all ports within the VLAN, including trunk ports, so that the packet can reach all ports present in the VLAN on all switches.

Correct Answer
Kevin Dorrell Tue, 10/02/2007 - 00:02

Yes, for an unknown unicast, the switch will forward the frame to all ports on the VLAN, including any trunks, unless the port is in Spanning Tree blocking state, or unless the trunk does not have the VLAN on its "allowed" list.

For an unknown multicast, the situation is slightly different. If it is an IP multicast (but not in the range 224.0.0.x), and you have IGMP snooping or CGMP enabled on the switch, then the frame is only forwarded to those hosts that have actually expressed an interest in that multicast by sending an IGMP report for that address.

Kevin Dorrell

Luxembourg

orenjohnson Tue, 10/09/2007 - 18:53

If I can put it in layman's terms (experts, correct me if I am wrong). Since a vlan defines a broadcast domain, the unknown unicast would be flooded out all ports on the vlan with the exception of the port it was received on. Right or wrong?

swmorris Tue, 10/09/2007 - 20:28
rajibchicago Tue, 10/09/2007 - 21:31

yes it would flood out all ports on the vlan with the exception of port it was received but it would also forward the traffic on trunking ports if the particular vlan is allowed on the trunk.

cblake Tue, 10/30/2007 - 11:32

Do you have any recommendations on how to prevent unwanted unicast flooding? I am experiencing that issue on my network today. I have made some modifications to mac-address aging time (made = to arp aging), however am trying to figure out root cause of the floods.

Kevin Dorrell Thu, 11/01/2007 - 02:59

Yes, if your VLAN is pruning eligible, and if it is pruned from a trunk, then that trunk will not pass any flooded traffic for that VLAN. That includes broadcasts, multicasts (if no IGMP snooping), and flooded unicasts.

Kevin Dorrell

Luxembourg

swmorris Thu, 11/01/2007 - 07:44

VTP Pruning is a trunk feature. It will allow switches to prune back VLANs that have absolutely no access ports inside them.

Basically this decreases the amount of bandwidth on your trunk such that unknown unicasts or broadcast/multicast traffic aren't carried to every single switch for a vlan that only exists on one or two switches.

HTH,

Scott

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