Kevin Dorrell Wed, 10/03/2007 - 06:04
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That is not really supernetting - 115.64.4.0/22 is a normal subnet of the old Class A network 115.0.0.0/8.


For 115.64.4.0/22, a valid host address is anything from 115.64.4.1 to 115.64.7.254, a total of 1021 addresses. But normally you would break this range up into smaller chunks.


Kevin Dorrell

Luxembourg


paul.matthews Wed, 10/03/2007 - 06:09
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Er, I am not sure how the question fits in with CIDR and supernetting.


The basic quesion about 115.64.4.0/22 - well /22 gives 252 in the third octet - that gives networks of 0,4,8 etc, so this address block is 115.64.4.0-7.255. 7.255 is broacast if you use it all as a single network, and zero is the network ID, si 115.64.4.1-7.254 are available.


I suspect that is not what you are asking. CIDR is basically forget about class A/B/C etc, you need to know the mask to know about a network. Supernetting is very similar to summarisation.

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