Mesh self healing

Answered Question
Nov 13th, 2007
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Becoming more apart of a 1510 mesh install... Trying to resolve various issues and seeing if i found another.


All of my 1510s are at a TX level of 1.. Which according to documentation is max power. I have the various dBm levels this corrisponds to so no need to point me to them.


Now my question is this.... If all my 1510s are set to a power level of 1, can they still self heal?


While yes you could increase the cell size by going to a lower data rate, however these cells already have the lower data rates selected.

Correct Answer by ericgarnel about 9 years 5 months ago

You are quite welcome! A properly designed mesh

though can "self heal" itself. It all falls under the properties of the mesh itself.

Dennis outlines it very well in his thread above.

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dennischolmes Wed, 11/14/2007 - 07:04
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When you say the "MESH" and "Self Heal" I am assuming you are discussing the backhaul on the 1510s. The MESH is selfhealing when there are multiple backhaul links available between the APs. If one AP (MAP or Mesh Access Point) fails the traffic is routed to a secondary pathway back to a Root Access Point(RAP). The adaptive wireless protocol stores 3 routes if they are available and calculates the best value to assign which route will be used to carry backhaul traffic. The 802.11a backhaul is configured to default power setting and channel assignment by the controller and is not controlled by RRM. RRM does control the client service side for b/g but requires a very dense population of APs for this to work properly and is usually not practical in a real world deployment. Hence, almost all MESH networks are manually configured and designed, and as such, it is why Cisco has the MESH ATP.

robertham Wed, 11/14/2007 - 09:38
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Nope not the backhaul. One of the selling points that was made to them was the reported ability to "self heal" in the event of a PAP going offline. PAP goes offline, surrounding PAPs then have their power increased automatically and thus coverage area is maintained.


My contention is.... IF this is a true feature and the power is already manually set to the maximum then it is not possible for the system to increase power and fill in those gaps. Due to the 1510 being at max output...

ericgarnel Wed, 11/14/2007 - 10:11
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You are basically answering your own question.

If the AP is manually set to max power it will not be able to increase power automatically or by manual intervention, nor will it be able to reduce power either in the event that it overlaps with another AP.

Yes, if they are allowed to manage power automatically, then the APs will increase or decrease based on signal factors. We see it all the time with our APs when "false" walls are opened or closed.

"self heal" is more a mesh term imho

robertham Wed, 11/14/2007 - 10:52
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Thanks Eric (+5). All i was finding was marketing publications. Wanted some another set of eyes to bounce that off of. =)


Im not a big fan of the word 'self heal' myself... But whatever.

Correct Answer
ericgarnel Wed, 11/14/2007 - 10:58
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You are quite welcome! A properly designed mesh

though can "self heal" itself. It all falls under the properties of the mesh itself.

Dennis outlines it very well in his thread above.

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