Embedded Event Manager (EEM) Scripting Community

Unanswered Question
Jan 16th, 2008

Hi,

Does anyone implement the EEM before?I need to know his feedback about it

Regards,

Welcome

I have this problem too.
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Joe Clarke Fri, 01/18/2008 - 13:35

I have done quite a bit with EEM, as have many others. There is a repository of EEM policies and libraries at http://www.cisco.com/go/ciscobeyond/ that may be of use to you. Feel free to ask EEM questions in the Network Management Netpro forum, and I will be glad to answer them.

welcomeccie Mon, 01/21/2008 - 02:28

Thanks for your reply,i'd like to evaluate it .I mean what are the benefites using it?

Regards,

Welcome

Joe Clarke Mon, 01/21/2008 - 10:47

EEM allows you to offload some of the management tasks from your NMS directly to the device. This will obviously reduce network traffic since the device is managing itself, but it will also decrease the time needed before one is notified about a network event.

EEM policies can run periodically to collect information from the device and dump that information to a file on flash or a network server. This is very useful for troubleshooting problems and performing root cause analysis.

EEM also has the ability to run IOS exec and config commands when events occur. So, instead of simply being notified that some has happened, EEM can correct or workaround the problem instantly to avoid any downtime or performance impact.

In addition to failover and high-availability operations, EEM can also be used to work around certain bugs. For example, if you are running a version of IOS that has a bug which can lead to a crash when one types, "show ip eigrp topology," and you cannot upgrade to a fixed version right away, you can configure EEM to intercept that command, and drop it so that the crash does not occur.

For more on EEM, see http://www.cisco.com/go/eem/ .

welcomeccie Tue, 01/22/2008 - 01:15

Thank you very much for your feedback .I appreciate your assistance.I have one more question pls.

Is it client-server application or what ? are they scriptes on the routers or installed sofware on a server or what?

welcomeccie Tue, 01/22/2008 - 02:16

Thank you very much for your feedback .I appreciate your assistance.I have one more question pls.

Is it client-server application or what ? are they scriptes on the routers or installed sofware on a server or what?

Joe Clarke Tue, 01/22/2008 - 10:23

EEM supports both cli-based and TCL-based policies. The cli-based policies are configured directly into the device's running config, and persisted to NVRAM during a write mem. The TCL-based policies can be located on flash, or on a network server (e.g. TFTP). When they are registered as active EEM policies with the device, they are copied from their current location to a protected portion of flash for execution.

All EEM policies, once registered, reside on the device, and require no external NMS interaction to run. Of course, some of the actions you can take will require an external server. For example, you can have an EEM policy send email, syslog messages, or SNMP traps.

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