AP1242 - does it require antennas?

Answered Question
Feb 20th, 2008

Hi,


Product ref: AIR-LAP1242AG-E-K9


Looking to buy one of these for a SOHO location (unlikely to be a very harsh environment). Is it essential to buy antennas to plug into the RP-TNC connectors, or can the AP1242 do wireless without them?


Thanks in advance,


Darren

Correct Answer by Rob Huffman about 9 years 5 days ago

Hi Darren,


The 1242 AP will require at least 2 External Antennas. Have a look (there are Dual RP-TNC connectors for 2.4GHz b/g radio and 5 GHz a radio) so you will want at least one Antenna for each radio;


Antenna Connectors - AP 1242


2.4 GHz


Dual RP-TNC connectors


5 GHz


Dual RP-TNC connectors



Cisco Aironet 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Antennas and Accessories


The choice you make will depend on the Coverage pattern you desire. There are a number of Models for the 1242 listed here;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6521/products_data_sheet09186a008022b11b.html



**** Be careful to order this model AIR-AP1242AG-E-K9 (Note the no "L" . This model without the "L" is the standalone IOS version.



Hope this helps!

Rob



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Correct Answer
Rob Huffman Wed, 02/20/2008 - 08:05

Hi Darren,


The 1242 AP will require at least 2 External Antennas. Have a look (there are Dual RP-TNC connectors for 2.4GHz b/g radio and 5 GHz a radio) so you will want at least one Antenna for each radio;


Antenna Connectors - AP 1242


2.4 GHz


Dual RP-TNC connectors


5 GHz


Dual RP-TNC connectors



Cisco Aironet 2.4 GHz and 5 GHz Antennas and Accessories


The choice you make will depend on the Coverage pattern you desire. There are a number of Models for the 1242 listed here;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6521/products_data_sheet09186a008022b11b.html



**** Be careful to order this model AIR-AP1242AG-E-K9 (Note the no "L" . This model without the "L" is the standalone IOS version.



Hope this helps!

Rob



Darren Coleman Wed, 02/20/2008 - 08:16

Thanks for that info Rob.


The units I've been offered are specifically the AIR-LAP1242AG-E-K9 model, is there a problem with using these or can you simply not connect to them via console/network to configure them?


Thanks again,


Darren

Rob Huffman Wed, 02/20/2008 - 10:03

Hi Darren,


Sure, this is very possible :) If someone is offering the LAP version they can be easily changed to IOS.


Reverting the Access Point Back to Autonomous Mode


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/prod_technical_reference09186a00804fc3dc.html#wp161272


You can convert an access point from lightweight mode back to autonomous mode by loading a Cisco IOS Release that supports autonomous mode (Cisco IOS release 12.3(7)JA or earlier). If the access point is associated to a controller, you can use the controller to load the Cisco IOS release. If the access point is not associated to a controller, you can load the Cisco IOS release using TFTP.


Using a TFTP Server to Return to a Previous Release


Follow these steps to revert from LWAPP mode to autonomous mode by loading a Cisco IOS release using a TFTP server:



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Step 1 The static IP address of the PC on which your TFTP server software runs should be between 10.0.0.2 and 10.0.0.30.


Step 2 Make sure that the PC contains the access point image file (such as c1200-k9w7-tar.122-15.JA.tar for a 1200 series access point) in the TFTP server folder and that the TFTP server is activated.


Step 3 Rename the access point image file in the TFTP server folder to c1200-k9w7-tar.default for a 1200 series access point, c1130-k9w7-tar.default for an 1130 series access point, and c1240-k9w7-tar.default for a 1240 series access point.


Step 4 Connect the PC to the access point using a Category 5 (CAT5) Ethernet cable.


Step 5 Disconnect power from the access point.


Step 6 Press and hold MODE while you reconnect power to the access point.


Step 7 Hold the MODE button until the status LED turns red (approximately 20 to 30 seconds) and then release.


Step 8 Wait until the access point reboots, as indicated by all LEDs turning green followed by the Status LED blinking green.


Step 9 After the access point reboots, reconfigure it using the GUI or the CLI.


From this doc;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/prod_technical_reference09186a00804fc3dc.html#wp161272


Hope this helps!

Rob


Darren Coleman Thu, 02/21/2008 - 07:28

Thanks Rob.


After careful consideration I've decided this device is probably overkill for my needs at the moment, but I appreciate you taking the time to post this useful information - I will no doubt make use of it in the future!


Regards,


Daz

jay_02420 Wed, 04/09/2008 - 09:46

hi all ! I found this post interesting because it somehow applied to my scenario. I currently have 6 1130 AP deployed over 6 floors. I'm adding 5 more AIR-AP1242AG-A-K9. I searched for external antennas and I came out with the following:


2.4 GHz: ANT5959 antenna x 2

5 GHz: AIR-ANT5145V-R antenna x 2


Is it a good choice ?


Can I connect these antennas with LMR400 20 ft cables using (1) RP-TNC plug and (1) RP-TNC jack connector ?


I need to have some positioning flexibility. If i understand ur post, the 1242 AP does not have an integrated antenna (like the 113) and needs an external one ?

Scott Fella Wed, 04/09/2008 - 15:10

Those antennas are fine as long as you mount them on the ceiling. With any type of LMR cable, you can have ends of any type crimped for you. You will need external antennas for the 1242.

Rob Huffman Thu, 04/10/2008 - 04:50

Hi Jamal,


Just to add a note to the good info from Scott. Both of the Antennas you listed are Diversity Patch versions so you will only require 1 of each per 1242 AP. Each Antenna will require 2 RP-TNC connections :)


AIR-ANT5959


Diversity Omnidirectional


Ceiling-mount diversity indoor antenna with RP-TNC connectors-This antenna was designed for WLAN applications for frequencies of 2400-2500 MHz. The antenna is omnidirectional and has a nominal gain of 2.2 dBi. Its low profile allows it to remain unnoticed in the ceiling. It comes with a clip that permits it to be mounted to a drop-ceiling cross member.


Cisco Aironet 2 dBi Diversity Omnidirectional Ceiling Mount Antenna (AIR-ANT5959)


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps469/prod_installation_guide09186a008007f904.html




AIR-ANT5145V-R


Diversity Omnidirectional


Indoor-only diversity omnidirectional 5 GHz antenna for use with the 1200 Series and the 802.11a module (AIR-RM22)


Cisco Aironet 4.5-dBi Low Profile Omnidirectional Antenna (AIR-ANT5145V-R)


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/antenna/installation/guide/ant545r.html

From this Antenna reference guide;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps469/products_data_sheet09186a008008883b.html


Hope this helps!

Rob


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