CCIE Lab scoring - Once again

Answered Question
Jul 8th, 2008

Hi all,

I'v been reading posts about this subject now and again but it's still a little unclear as to what I will be experiencing on the actual lab day.

My question:

Fact being that there are NO PARTIAL points in a section, how many points generally make up a section? Would it be possible to have an OSPF section for say 15 points, where a single mistake would probably ensure you failed the entire exam?

I would assume that there is some "reasonable", point-limit to the sections, with for instance a 12 point OSPF section divided into two or three parts and points, but then again, that may be wishful thinking! ;-) I'm currently grading myself by failing entire sections if wrong at a single section requirement...which is good practice, but rather harsh! ;-)

Hope anyone who's done the exam can provide some insight here!

Thanks a lot,

Reinier

I have this problem too.
0 votes
Correct Answer by tperrier about 8 years 5 months ago

I'm sure it's already been publicly explained (in one of those numerous Ask the expert threads led by Maurilio Gorito) that there's no partial credit by _question_, not by entire _section_, so it's not as bad as Reinier thought. But of course, if for example you fail question 1 on a section, and if later questions in the section depended on question 1, you could fail the whole section indirectly.

You absolutely don't have to care how scoring is done anyways, and knowing it won't change anything in the end. Your goal must be 100% accuracy, seriously! :) It's like these people asking for any Vue exam's pass mark: this satisfies one's curiosity, but won't improve in any way the chances of passing the exam.

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jim_berlow Tue, 07/08/2008 - 12:56

I would be testing the CCIE NDA to answer your question directly. What I would recommend is taking one of the CCIE assessor labs to get an idea of how sections are broken out & how the grading process works. Cisco is sensitive to people discussing grading procedures in this forum.

Jim

Kevin Dorrell Tue, 07/08/2008 - 22:35

As the previous poster pointed out, Cisco are sensitive about people discussing the scoring of the CCIE exam. However, I do not see any harm in pointing out something that is already published under the auspices of Cisco themselves:

Have a look at the CCIE practice labs book from CiscoPress. It is well out of date, but it was written by Maurilio Gorito. Maurilio is a CCIE proctor, so he should know the score. He has also held an "ask the expert" thread on this forum, so have a look in the archives and you will find the answer to your question.

If you do some approved vendor labs like the NetMasterClass CHECKiT, you will find that the marking scheme is similar to the one in the CiscoPress book. ;-)

Kevin Dorrell

Luxembourg

Correct Answer
tperrier Wed, 07/09/2008 - 00:29

I'm sure it's already been publicly explained (in one of those numerous Ask the expert threads led by Maurilio Gorito) that there's no partial credit by _question_, not by entire _section_, so it's not as bad as Reinier thought. But of course, if for example you fail question 1 on a section, and if later questions in the section depended on question 1, you could fail the whole section indirectly.

You absolutely don't have to care how scoring is done anyways, and knowing it won't change anything in the end. Your goal must be 100% accuracy, seriously! :) It's like these people asking for any Vue exam's pass mark: this satisfies one's curiosity, but won't improve in any way the chances of passing the exam.

reinierhamstra Wed, 07/09/2008 - 08:14

Thanks for that!

I agree fully, knowing how the points are used does little, you have to know your stuff. However, the fact that it's done the way you describe matters quite a lot. Interdependancies between sections/questions are a fact. A system where ADDITIONALLY whole sections could be faulted for a very small mistake would compound matters.

Thanks again!

Reinier

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