Problems passing Windows Domain traffic to VPN connected devices

Unanswered Question
Jul 18th, 2008

I am having a problem getting my VPN connected laptops to communicate correctly with my internal windows domain. They can't do things like change passwords or mount directories correctly. I am sure that there is an access list issue somewhere but I can't seem to find it.

I have a Cisco 6300 series running IOS 12.3. I have my VPN set up on int loopback4 which is on the 10.10.4.X network. From what I can see according to the interface there is no access list which is applied to it. My Windows server is on int fe0 which is the 10.10.1.X network. This interface does have an access list applied to the inside. I don't see anything on the interface which would restrict traffic to the 10.10.4.X traffic. I do have an a nonat access list applied to the outside of the external interface (int ser0) but that doesn't seem to be restricting any traffic relating to the 10.10.4.X network either.

Now add this to the fact that I have an access list called outsidein that I have to make changes to in order for certain programs to work, but which I can find no interfaces which have it listed. This means to me that somehow I am not seeing all of the active access lists and what interfaces they apply to. Therefore I am having a really rough time figuring out which access list I need to make changes to in order to open the VPN up to windows traffic.

I have this problem too.
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cscbrannent Fri, 07/18/2008 - 11:59

Hi Channon,

We're running our VPN with ASA 5540's with SSL VPN but have encountered the same issue as you and also with our former VPN, Nortel Contivity.

The issue we've found is that loging scripts ONLY run one time, when one logs into the domain. The same is true for password expiration warnings.

Even though you may have a solid vpn connection - with full IP connectivity into the Windows Domain, you have to have Windows send a CTRL-ALT-DEL GINA message to login to the domain. The trick is you have to do it with the tunnel up.

Nortel calls it "Logon on Connect". Cisco calls it "Start Before Logon".

So, with our SSL VPN, we have the clients configured so the VPN tunnel starts as soon as they do the CTRL-ALT-DEL - this fires the Cisco VPN login, THEN they get the Microsoft Logon (at which point, they're logging into their local PC and the Windows Domain (through the tunnel) at the same time).

I hope this helps.


channon_katt Fri, 07/18/2008 - 12:19

We aren't using a cisco VPN client, we are using a direct windows logon. Are you saying that I would most likely have to go to a vpn client in order to make this work correctly?

husycisco Fri, 07/18/2008 - 12:53

Hello Kenneth,

As previously mentioned, you should establish VPN before logging in.

Cisco VPN client is an option, but the small checkbox at logon screen "Use Dial-up networking" will make you able to select the Microsoft VPN connection and connect it before logon, and you are done.

Double check that VPN clients are assigned the IP of your DC (Assuming that it has integrated DNS) as DNS server address.



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