1250 Dual Radio

Unanswered Question
Aug 20th, 2008

The 1250 Series Access Point, is it a Dual-N Band Access Point (where both 2.4GHz and 5GHz work in 802.11n) or a Hybrid Band (where 2.4GHz work with 802.11g & 5GHz with 802.11n) or a Single Band (either of the modules work at a time) device??

What do you have to do the make the 1250 Access Point work in Dual Band??

Why are there 2 dot11 radio interfaces on an access point? does one work in 2.4GHz and the other work in 5GHz??

Thanks

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Scott Fella Tue, 08/26/2008 - 17:26

The 1252 is a dual radio access point. One radio is an 802.11a/n and the other is a 802.11b/g/n. Users will associate to either one of the radios at a time. This is considered as a dual band AP since it can associate clients on the 2.4GHz and the 5GHz, but not both at the same time. No need to.... because of 802.11N. In a normal 80.211 a/b/g operation, a 20mhz channel width is used. 802.11N bonds two adjacent channels to provide a 40mhz channel width that gives you the extra speed up to 300mbps.

jennyjohn Wed, 08/27/2008 - 09:38

Thanks Guys,

interface dot11radio { 0 | 1 }, where

The 2.4-GHz radio is radio 0, and the 5-GHz radio is radio 1.

The 2.4-GHz 802.11n radio is 0, and the 5-GHz 802.11n radio is 1.

fella5, 40MHz channel width used in 802.11n .. really intresting!

So, as I understand it, I can assign the same ssid to both the radio's and both the radio's can work simultaneously, but allowing the client to be associated with only one radio at a time.

Thanks.

Scott Fella Wed, 08/27/2008 - 15:50

You are correct. However, in an enterprise installations, 802.11N should only be deployed on the 5GHz radio and not the 2.4GHz. This is due to only having 3 overlapping channels on the 2.4GHz. If you have bonded channel 1 and 6 on AP1, that leaves you with only channel 11. Since there are more overlapping channels on the 5GHz spectrum, it makes more sense to channel bond on that frequency range.

So you can still have legacy devices associate to 802.11b/g some on 802.11a and otheres who support "N" on 802.11N on the 5GHz side.

Scott Fella Wed, 08/27/2008 - 15:50

You are correct. However, in an enterprise installations, 802.11N should only be deployed on the 5GHz radio and not the 2.4GHz. This is due to only having 3 overlapping channels on the 2.4GHz. If you have bonded channel 1 and 6 on AP1, that leaves you with only channel 11. Since there are more overlapping channels on the 5GHz spectrum, it makes more sense to channel bond on that frequency range.

So you can still have legacy devices associate to 802.11b/g some on 802.11a and otheres who support "N" on 802.11N on the 5GHz side.

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