Music on hold

Answered Question
Sep 29th, 2008

I am keen to understand the flow of MOH.

If you are calling someone internally on the lan. You have a g711 stream(s1)setup. when the called party presses hold and MOH plays. what actually happens?

Is another session (s2)created or does MOH play on the first (s1)?

I ask this as I have seen that if you are using locations based CAC then MOH isn't included in the calculation

I have this problem too.
0 votes
Correct Answer by rob.huffman about 8 years 3 months ago

Hi Paul,

Let's go with this example;

Call Admission Control and MoH

Call admission control (CAC) is required when IP telephony traffic is traveling across WAN links. Due to the limited bandwidth available on these links, it is highly probable that voice media traffic might get delayed or dropped without appropriate call admission control.

Call admission control for Unified CM (based on either static locations or RSVP-enabled locations) is capable of tracking unicast MoH streams traversing the WAN but not multicast MoH streams. Thus, even if WAN bandwidth has been fully subscribed, a multicast MoH stream will not be denied access to the WAN by call admission control. Instead, the stream will be sent across the WAN, likely resulting in poor audio stream quality and poor quality on all other calls traversing the WAN. To ensure that multicast MoH streams do not cause this over-subscription situation, you should over-provision the QoS configuration on all downstream WAN interfaces by configuring the low-latency queuing (LLQ) voice priority queue with additional bandwidth. Because MoH streams are uni-directional, only the voice priority queues of the downstream interfaces (from the central site to remote sites) must be over-provisioned. Add enough bandwidth for every unique multicast MoH stream that might traverse the WAN link. For example, if there are four unique multicast audio streams that could potentially traverse the WAN, then add 96 kbps to the voice priority queue (4 * 24 kbps per G.729 audio stream = 96 kbps).

Have a look at Figure 7-5 shows an example of call admission control and MoH in a centralized multisite deployment.

From this good doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/srnd/7x/moh.html#wp1043877

Hope this helps!

Rob

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Overall Rating: 5 (1 ratings)
Loading.
pcromwell Mon, 09/29/2008 - 09:07

thanks Rob,

I assume then that MOH has no effect on the bandwidth used for CAC purposes?

Correct Answer
rob.huffman Mon, 09/29/2008 - 09:37

Hi Paul,

Let's go with this example;

Call Admission Control and MoH

Call admission control (CAC) is required when IP telephony traffic is traveling across WAN links. Due to the limited bandwidth available on these links, it is highly probable that voice media traffic might get delayed or dropped without appropriate call admission control.

Call admission control for Unified CM (based on either static locations or RSVP-enabled locations) is capable of tracking unicast MoH streams traversing the WAN but not multicast MoH streams. Thus, even if WAN bandwidth has been fully subscribed, a multicast MoH stream will not be denied access to the WAN by call admission control. Instead, the stream will be sent across the WAN, likely resulting in poor audio stream quality and poor quality on all other calls traversing the WAN. To ensure that multicast MoH streams do not cause this over-subscription situation, you should over-provision the QoS configuration on all downstream WAN interfaces by configuring the low-latency queuing (LLQ) voice priority queue with additional bandwidth. Because MoH streams are uni-directional, only the voice priority queues of the downstream interfaces (from the central site to remote sites) must be over-provisioned. Add enough bandwidth for every unique multicast MoH stream that might traverse the WAN link. For example, if there are four unique multicast audio streams that could potentially traverse the WAN, then add 96 kbps to the voice priority queue (4 * 24 kbps per G.729 audio stream = 96 kbps).

Have a look at Figure 7-5 shows an example of call admission control and MoH in a centralized multisite deployment.

From this good doc;

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/srnd/7x/moh.html#wp1043877

Hope this helps!

Rob

Actions

This Discussion