Extending Wireless Connection 600ft?

Unanswered Question
Oct 22nd, 2008

I have a cable internet connection in bldg 1 where we have a wirelss internet connection (on a linksys wrt54g)set up for our customers for free public access. I have another computer in bldg2 which is about 600 feet away with clear access no trees nothing. I cannot run cable underground or on telephone poles I want to use the wireless internet connection for bldg2 so my big question is how can I expand my wireless signal to reach bldg 2 and be strong ?? What routers do you recommend to upgrade my existing router? Should I go to the new N technology ? Also what antennas do you recommend?Thanks for your help and input ahead of time !!

Ehunt32

I have this problem too.
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jeff.kish Wed, 10/22/2008 - 09:24

Well, understand first that you can't simply extend your little LinkSys's signal to the next building. You're going to have to establish a wireless point-to-point bridge, which will then connect to additional equipment over in your next building over.

For such a short link, you should get a couple of Cisco 1310 bridges (AIR-BR1310G-A-K9). These have built-in antennas, so there's no need to worry about getting antennas installed. Mount these on the roofs of your buildings, probably on a non-penetrating roof mount. You'll run a connection off of the remote 1310G bridge to a switch of some kind, and then have another LinkSys (or preferably a Cisco AP) hanging off of it.

Sadly, there are no 802.11n bridges in existence yet. However, if you want to explore a Cisco 802.11n AP instead of the LinkSys, look for the AIR-AP1252AG-A-K9. This access point is a great one that performs 802.11n.

I hope this helps!

dennischolmes Sun, 10/26/2008 - 08:21

A range of 600 feet through building walls is exceeding reasonable expectations while remaining under FCC regulations. I would do a point to point bridge and allow that to feed an access point in bldg 2 or switched network connections. Understand that bridging is a best effort network as it depends heavily on good rf conditions. Rain, snow, and physical obstructions moving around between the bridges will cause fluctuations of throughput.

Scott Fella Sun, 10/26/2008 - 18:21

As Dennis mentioned, that is a far shot. You might as well get a dsl connection in the other building if you are looking for a cheap solution.

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