limit traffic

Answered Question
Jan 14th, 2009
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Hi, we recently upgraded our Internet pipe from T1 to 6Mbps and it is burstable up to 45Mbps. We recently went over the 6Mbps and we are getting charged for every Meg we go over. My question is can I do anything on the router to limit the incoming traffic? Or do I have to talk to the ISP to lower the burstable traffic limit? We do not have any web filtering device and we allow all http traffic without restrictions due to nature of the business. Thanks in advance for your help!!!!!

Correct Answer by Joseph W. Doherty about 8 years 4 months ago

Usually, you can easily limit outbound traffic, but limiting inbound is often not very effective to control inbound link bandwidth utilization.


If most of your inbound is TCP traffic, which should be the case with the HTTP traffic you mention, you could rate limit the inbound TCP and/or shape outbound ACKs. For either approach, you may need to target for an inbound rate much lower than 6 Mbps to keep bursts from exceeding the 6 Mbps.


Otherwise, you might want to talk to your ISP to have them stop bursting above 6 Mbps. (They should be able to accomplished that by shaping.)

Correct Answer by Jon Marshall about 8 years 4 months ago

Bart


You can limit what goes out but by it's nature http traffic is small requests and larger responses so yes you need to to talk to your ISP.


Jon

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Correct Answer
Jon Marshall Wed, 01/14/2009 - 09:25
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Bart


You can limit what goes out but by it's nature http traffic is small requests and larger responses so yes you need to to talk to your ISP.


Jon

Correct Answer
Joseph W. Doherty Wed, 01/14/2009 - 09:32
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Usually, you can easily limit outbound traffic, but limiting inbound is often not very effective to control inbound link bandwidth utilization.


If most of your inbound is TCP traffic, which should be the case with the HTTP traffic you mention, you could rate limit the inbound TCP and/or shape outbound ACKs. For either approach, you may need to target for an inbound rate much lower than 6 Mbps to keep bursts from exceeding the 6 Mbps.


Otherwise, you might want to talk to your ISP to have them stop bursting above 6 Mbps. (They should be able to accomplished that by shaping.)

bsudol79p Wed, 01/14/2009 - 09:41
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That is what I figured, I just wanted some feedback from the experts. Thanks for your help!!

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