Queueing strategy: VIP-based fair queuing

Answered Question
Feb 6th, 2009

Hey guys,

Can anyone please explain what type of queing this is.

I placed this config on my 6513 routers.

class-map match-any C-VOICE-SIGNAL

description VoIP SIGNALLING

match ip dscp af31

match ip dscp cs3

class-map match-any C-VOICE

description VoIP TRAFFIC

match ip dscp ef

match protocol rtp audio

!

!

policy-map P-VOICE

class C-VOICE

priority percent 40

class C-VOICE-SIGNAL

bandwidth percent 5

class class-default

fair-queue

and applied it to several interfaces.

When I check the interface I see this as the queing strategy. I know LLQ, CBWFQ, WFQ etc but is "VIP-based fair queuing" another flavour of LLQ?

I just thought I add this to show you were I see the Queueing strategy: VIP-based fair queuing.

This is a show interface

Serial6/0/0/5:5 is up, line protocol is up

Hardware is CT3

Description:

Internet address is

MTU 1500 bytes, BW 1536 Kbit, DLY 20000 usec,

reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255

Encapsulation PPP, crc 16, loopback not set

Keepalive set (10 sec)

LCP Open

Open: IPCP, CDPCP

Last input 00:00:02, output 00:00:02, output hang never

Last clearing of "show interface" counters 3w0d

Input queue: 0/75/0/0 (size/max/drops/flushes); Total output drops: 166

Queueing strategy: VIP-based fair queuing

Output queue: 0/40 (size/max)

5 minute input rate 1000 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec

5 minute output rate 1000 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec

8252744 packets input, 2674535206 bytes, 0 no buffer

Received 0 broadcasts (479808 IP multicast)

0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles

39 input errors, 4 CRC, 26 frame, 1 overrun, 0 ignored, 8 abort

9606256 packets output, 6260293022 bytes, 0 underruns

0 output errors, 0 collisions, 0 interface resets

0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out

0 carrier transitions no alarm present

Timeslot(s) Used: 1-24, Transmitter delay is 0 flags

non-inverted data

I have this problem too.
0 votes
Correct Answer by Paolo Bevilacqua about 7 years 9 months ago

Hi, the VIP was the first cisco platform doing distributed processing.

Now, even if on a different architectures, they use the same term to indicate packet processing done by a line card processor rather than the central one.

So, there is nothing to worry about.

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Correct Answer
Paolo Bevilacqua Sat, 02/07/2009 - 04:13

Hi, the VIP was the first cisco platform doing distributed processing.

Now, even if on a different architectures, they use the same term to indicate packet processing done by a line card processor rather than the central one.

So, there is nothing to worry about.

babatunde_sanda Sat, 02/07/2009 - 15:39

Thanks for the response. Am not worried cause I actually verified my config but was just surprised to see the VIP instead of CBWFQ under my interfaces. Curiosity got the best of me and I started researching what it was but still decided to have professionals such as yourself take a knife at it (You know Cisco's website documentations can go on and on about a simply explanation). Your explanation of the line card makes sense because I actually had a hunch its probably because of the platform I have the configuration on.

Thanks for the input.

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