Switch Router Naming Convention

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Feb 10th, 2009
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What do you think about the following naming convention....


L1-1-500-1-4-5124


L=facility

1=building

1=floor

500=room

1=rack

4=position on rack

5124=x.x.5.124 (last two octets of IP)


It makes it easy to troubleshoot using monitoring tools. If a device goes down, I can tell easily see the IP and location information, and respond accordingly.


Does this scheme violate good security standards?


What conventions are common in your experience?


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mszeftawy Wed, 02/11/2009 - 01:07
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We have naming convention similar to this one.

I wanted to advise you never to use this convention, it makes it very hard to troubleshoot or to identify the routers or switches. if you need to have this info on the router you should add it may be on the banner or you may add it in "snmp-server location XXXXXXX" this may also be useful.

Also it would be very hard to change this nameing convention once implemented.


I suggest to use naming convention that contains the function and the geografical location.

EX: SW-LAX-servicename.



oneirishpollack Wed, 02/11/2009 - 06:36
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Our network is part of a CAN. For the most part I monitor the switches and routers in our LAN. In terms of identifying the routers/switches, I think the naming convention we use identifies the device location all the way down to rack position and IP. Why do you feel it makes it hard to troubleshoot or identify?

Giuseppe Larosa Wed, 02/11/2009 - 10:12
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Hello Kelly,

it is very handy to have something that tells you the role of device


we use

RT-Town-street&number-floor-E-progressive


or


SW-Town-street&number-floor-C-progressive


town is actually a two letters code

also street name are the first letters of the street name.


Information about what location and rack number are useful but can be stored in an inventory database.


When doing day to day troubleshooting and configuration you need to move from routers or layer3 switches to L2 switches using a telnet or SSH access.


It is very handy to be able to compose the name easily.


Hope to help

Giuseppe


Leo Laohoo Wed, 02/11/2009 - 15:52
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Don't make your hostname too long either. I believe 21 is the maximum of characters you're allowed for a hostname.

johnlloyd_13 Thu, 02/12/2009 - 05:54
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we use hostname convention in our enterprise:


AAABBCC-NN


where AAA is the first 3 letters of the city or location


BB is the state


CC is the first 2 digits of the platform/model


NN is the order of the device


for example AUSTX38-01


AUS is Austin

TX is Texas

38 is 3800 router

01 is the first device on that location or LAN

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