WLC

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Feb 27th, 2009
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I'm not sure really how to ask this, but I have done some testing in a classroom on my college campus using a wired connection and then a wireless connection. When connected wirelessly, I can see other devices in the network. When connected through ethernet, I can not see the other devices within my network. I use a Cisco Wireless LAN Controller and wonder if there should be a setting disabled in the WLC that would not allow wireless connections to see our other devices? Thanks in advance!

Correct Answer by Rob Huffman about 8 years 2 months ago

Hi Kristy,


Maybe this is what you are looking for, note the nice change in WLC Version 4.2.x.x;


Q. In autonomous APs, Public Secure Packet Forwarding (PSPF) is used to avoid client devices associated to this AP from inadvertently sharing files with other client devices on the wireless network. Is there any equivalent feature in Lightweight APs?


A. The feature or the mode that performs the similar function of PSPF in Lightweight architecture is called peer-to-peer blocking mode. Peer-to-peer blocking mode is actually available with the controllers that manage the LAP.


If this mode is disabled on the controller, which is by default, it allows the wireless clients to communicate with each other through the controller. If the mode is enabled, it blocks the communication between clients through the controller.


It only works among the APs that have joined to the same controller. When enabled, this mode does not block wireless clients terminated on one controller from the ability to get to wireless clients terminated on a different controller, even in the same mobility group.



http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_qanda_item09186a00806a4da3.shtml


Configuring Peer-to-Peer Blocking


In controller software releases prior to 4.2, peer-to-peer blocking is applied globally to all clients on all WLANs and causes traffic between two clients on the same VLAN to be transferred to the upstream VLAN rather than being bridged by the controller. This behavior usually results in traffic being dropped at the upstream switch because switches do not forward packets out the same port on which they are received.


In controller software release 4.2, peer-to-peer blocking is applied to individual WLANs, and each client inherits the peer-to-peer blocking setting of the WLAN to which it is associated.


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/controller/4.2/configuration/guide/c42wlan.html#wp1084832


Hope this helps!

Rob


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Scott Fella Fri, 02/27/2009 - 08:35
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What exactly do you mean? You see other devices when on wireless and not on wired?

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Rob Huffman Fri, 02/27/2009 - 08:53
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Hi Kristy,


Maybe this is what you are looking for, note the nice change in WLC Version 4.2.x.x;


Q. In autonomous APs, Public Secure Packet Forwarding (PSPF) is used to avoid client devices associated to this AP from inadvertently sharing files with other client devices on the wireless network. Is there any equivalent feature in Lightweight APs?


A. The feature or the mode that performs the similar function of PSPF in Lightweight architecture is called peer-to-peer blocking mode. Peer-to-peer blocking mode is actually available with the controllers that manage the LAP.


If this mode is disabled on the controller, which is by default, it allows the wireless clients to communicate with each other through the controller. If the mode is enabled, it blocks the communication between clients through the controller.


It only works among the APs that have joined to the same controller. When enabled, this mode does not block wireless clients terminated on one controller from the ability to get to wireless clients terminated on a different controller, even in the same mobility group.



http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_qanda_item09186a00806a4da3.shtml


Configuring Peer-to-Peer Blocking


In controller software releases prior to 4.2, peer-to-peer blocking is applied globally to all clients on all WLANs and causes traffic between two clients on the same VLAN to be transferred to the upstream VLAN rather than being bridged by the controller. This behavior usually results in traffic being dropped at the upstream switch because switches do not forward packets out the same port on which they are received.


In controller software release 4.2, peer-to-peer blocking is applied to individual WLANs, and each client inherits the peer-to-peer blocking setting of the WLAN to which it is associated.


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/controller/4.2/configuration/guide/c42wlan.html#wp1084832


Hope this helps!

Rob


Rob Huffman Fri, 02/27/2009 - 11:08
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Hi Kristy,


You are most welcome :)


Cheers!

Rob

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