HOW DO I?: Multiple simoultaneous language support UCCX

Answered Question
Jul 16th, 2009

I need to have 3 languages installed on a UCCX server. The system populates a default language (US English in this case) at installation.

I need to add support for both Spanish and French. I'm looking for information on how to create these within the system, and where/how I get the system prompts in these languages loaded so that they are all available on the system.

I have this problem too.
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Correct Answer by Jonathan Schulenberg about 7 years 4 months ago

Be sure to specify what version of CCX you are using. I am going to assume 5.0+ in my answer.

Multiple languages in CCX are handled really well from an IVR perspective. CAD/CSD/HRC localization is another story.

To enable an additional language, start by choosing a group default and at least one country-specific localization value. This is done under System > Language Information. Once you have done this you will see a new folder for that language within the Prompt Repository. All system prompts have been enabled at this point as well. I will cover what to do if your desired language is not offered in a moment.

Next you need to tell the script the language the caller should be treated with. You have a few places you can do this at:

A) Specify a language on the JTAPI trigger. Any call arriving on this trigger will be assigned this language.

B) Use the Set Contact Info step to set (or change) the language. This can be done anywhere in a script. A common example is changing the language as soon as the caller makes a selection for a specific language.

C) Override at an individual prompt level by adding a qualifier. Example: P[example.wav] @ L[en_US]

Each option is more granular than the previous. For the first two scenarios, anything that uses a prompt will attempt to pull it from that language directory within your Prompt Repository. The third option overrides the language only for that exact prompt. If the file does not exist in that folder, it will also attempt whatever your system default is; typically en_US.

So, if you write a script and use a Play Prompt step, you can use the same prompt variable/file name for all of the languages; P[example.wav] for example. This is because the language of the contact at the time that step is executed will decide which WAV file is played.

Lastly, you can also add your own languages. You start by creating a new language directory within the Prompt Directory (Create Language from Related Tasks area). This must be in ISO 639-1 format. This means either xx or xx_YY where xx is a lowercase, two-letter abbreviation of the language and xx_YY includes an optional localization. Example: en is English and en_US is English (United States). Note that 639-1 did not include all countries. Hmong is a common example of one that is missing. You'll need to create your own two-letter abbreviation that doesn't conflict with any of the existing 639-1 values.

http://www.loc.gov/standards/iso639-2/php/code_list.php

Once you have created the folder, you can use any of the previously explained methods to call that language. The one thing you'll be missing are system prompts for that language.

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Correct Answer
Jonathan Schulenberg Mon, 07/20/2009 - 14:03

Be sure to specify what version of CCX you are using. I am going to assume 5.0+ in my answer.

Multiple languages in CCX are handled really well from an IVR perspective. CAD/CSD/HRC localization is another story.

To enable an additional language, start by choosing a group default and at least one country-specific localization value. This is done under System > Language Information. Once you have done this you will see a new folder for that language within the Prompt Repository. All system prompts have been enabled at this point as well. I will cover what to do if your desired language is not offered in a moment.

Next you need to tell the script the language the caller should be treated with. You have a few places you can do this at:

A) Specify a language on the JTAPI trigger. Any call arriving on this trigger will be assigned this language.

B) Use the Set Contact Info step to set (or change) the language. This can be done anywhere in a script. A common example is changing the language as soon as the caller makes a selection for a specific language.

C) Override at an individual prompt level by adding a qualifier. Example: P[example.wav] @ L[en_US]

Each option is more granular than the previous. For the first two scenarios, anything that uses a prompt will attempt to pull it from that language directory within your Prompt Repository. The third option overrides the language only for that exact prompt. If the file does not exist in that folder, it will also attempt whatever your system default is; typically en_US.

So, if you write a script and use a Play Prompt step, you can use the same prompt variable/file name for all of the languages; P[example.wav] for example. This is because the language of the contact at the time that step is executed will decide which WAV file is played.

Lastly, you can also add your own languages. You start by creating a new language directory within the Prompt Directory (Create Language from Related Tasks area). This must be in ISO 639-1 format. This means either xx or xx_YY where xx is a lowercase, two-letter abbreviation of the language and xx_YY includes an optional localization. Example: en is English and en_US is English (United States). Note that 639-1 did not include all countries. Hmong is a common example of one that is missing. You'll need to create your own two-letter abbreviation that doesn't conflict with any of the existing 639-1 values.

http://www.loc.gov/standards/iso639-2/php/code_list.php

Once you have created the folder, you can use any of the previously explained methods to call that language. The one thing you'll be missing are system prompts for that language.

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