9.@ route pattern

Answered Question

there is route pattern 9.@ with route filter applied which will send calls to certain area codes to route-list A

then there is another route pattern 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX with route-list B


my confusion is the second route pattern seems more specific than 9.@ so domestic calls should follow route-list B but testing

shows calls to area codes defined in route-filter are going to route-list A


so what is the digit matching logic here?

Correct Answer by Michael Owuor about 7 years 12 months ago

Hello Eric,


The logic is to use the route pattern with the closest match to the number dialed by determining how many possible matches there are for each route pattern. In your case example, assuming one of the area codes in the route filter used by the 9.@ route pattern is 212, and when testing, a number with that area code is dialed. The candidate patterns in this case are:


* 9.@ where AREA-CODE==212

* 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX


The 9.@, is a macro that includes several individual route patterns that comprise the NANP, so in this case the pattern that is matched is 9.1212[2-9][02-9]XXXXX. So in effect the candidate patterns are:


* 9.1212[2-9][02-9]XXXXX

* 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX


Using closest match logic, determine how many possible matches there are for each route pattern. The closest match is the pattern that has the fewest possible matches.


* 9.1212[2-9][02-9]XXXXX = 8 x 9 x 10 to the power of 5

* 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX = 8 x 10 x 10 x 8 x 10 to the power of 6


The 9.@ route pattern is the closest match to the number dialed, and is therefore used.


Hope this helps.


Regards,

Michael.

Correct Answer by Brandon Buffin about 7 years 12 months ago

The @ wildcard is actually a representation of many different route patterns in the NANP. In this case, there is actually a pattern within @ that provides a closer match. Take a look at the following link.


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/voice_ip_comm/cucm/admin/5_0_4/ccmsys/a03rp.html#wp1050657


Hope this helps.


Brandon

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Correct Answer
Michael Owuor Thu, 07/23/2009 - 12:47
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  • Cisco Employee,

Hello Eric,


The logic is to use the route pattern with the closest match to the number dialed by determining how many possible matches there are for each route pattern. In your case example, assuming one of the area codes in the route filter used by the 9.@ route pattern is 212, and when testing, a number with that area code is dialed. The candidate patterns in this case are:


* 9.@ where AREA-CODE==212

* 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX


The 9.@, is a macro that includes several individual route patterns that comprise the NANP, so in this case the pattern that is matched is 9.1212[2-9][02-9]XXXXX. So in effect the candidate patterns are:


* 9.1212[2-9][02-9]XXXXX

* 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX


Using closest match logic, determine how many possible matches there are for each route pattern. The closest match is the pattern that has the fewest possible matches.


* 9.1212[2-9][02-9]XXXXX = 8 x 9 x 10 to the power of 5

* 9.1[2-9]XX[2-9]XXXXXX = 8 x 10 x 10 x 8 x 10 to the power of 6


The 9.@ route pattern is the closest match to the number dialed, and is therefore used.


Hope this helps.


Regards,

Michael.

Rob Huffman Fri, 07/24/2009 - 05:46
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Hi Michael,


Superb description of how this works! +5 points for this great work.


Cheers!

Rob

Michael Owuor Sun, 07/26/2009 - 20:19
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  • Cisco Employee,

Thanks for that Rob! Hope your weekend's going well!


Regards,

Michael.

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