Additional information needed

Unanswered Question
Nov 20th, 2009

I have been looking for the last couple of days for something that I thought was easy to find.  however i could not find it anywhere.  I wanted to know what size fastener is use to attach the rack mount brackets to the side of the 2811 router.  I could not find that info anywhere.  I know I am not the only person who has lost the screws that come with the kit.  Any help with this would be appreciated.Adding this to the manuals would be great also.


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mimeyer Tue, 12/08/2009 - 15:17

Hi, Wray --

The fastener to secure the bracket to the chassis is 8-32 x 0.375 inches, Cisco part number 48-0629-01. Eight of these parts ship with every unit in the rack mount kit. However, the fastener to secure the bracket to the rack depends on what the rack requires. That part is not provided by Cisco.

PLEASE NOTE THE FOLLOWING:

Regarding the non-Cisco fastener that secures the bracket to the rack: If the design of the head is undercut (tapered for countersinking) and the fastener is too long, the fastener can interfere with parts of the chassis and cause mechanical damage, electrical shorts, and so on. Therefore, use a Philips #1, flat-head, 8-32 x 0.375-in. fastener. The part should be carbon steel plated with zinc.


Because the appropriate fasteners are included with the initial shipment of Cisco equipment, our documents do not go into this level of detail.  However, we will consider whether there might be a place for this kind of supplementary information.

We hope this addresses your problem.

Regards,


Michael

wraptor01 Wed, 12/09/2009 - 05:15

Thank you Micheal.  You answered my question perfectly.


I do have an additional comment.  I my case and maybe in some of your other customers in my industry (Aerospace/Military) we are not able to, or it is very difficult to use typical OTS hardware.  It causes a problem during the stress analysis because the strength of the hardware is unknown and unverifiable.  Typically we have to take the supplied hardware and find its military specification equivalent.  That is another reason that if would be good to have hardware information in your manuals.


Thanks again.


Wray

Linda Waterhouse Fri, 12/11/2009 - 18:35

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Hi Wray,


We did a bit more digging, and there are FRU (field replaceable units) components identified for each product, which are orderable.  In the future if you need a replacement part, your best option is to order the FRU component that contains the part.  If you need a mapping of Cisco hardware parts to Milspec equivalents, it’s best to contact your Cisco account manager.


Linda

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