Mobility

Unanswered Question
Jan 25th, 2010

Is there a way to get calls received direct to mobile to be transfered to desk phone?

also I have a number of users with iphones. If I install the mobile communicator client on them, is there a way to move from wifi to GSM

thanks

I have this problem too.
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Jonathan Schulenberg Mon, 01/25/2010 - 07:55

Is there a way to get calls received direct to mobile to be transfered to desk phone?

This is called Unified Mobility and will work if the caller originally called the on-net user directory number. User Mobility, specifically Mobile Connect within UC Manager will anchor the call at the enterprise gateway and ring the off-net number simultaneously with the user's on-net IP phone. This allows the user to move the call between the two devices as needed.

Cisco UCM Features and Services Guide - Unified Mobility

If I install the mobile communicator client on them, is there a way to move from wifi to GSM

Mobile Communicator does not use WiFi at all. It uses the cellular data network to perform auxiliary signaling and features in addition to cellular-based voice traffic. If you have 802.11 and GSM dual-mode handsets, you will need to look at a different product to provide seamless roaming. This is rather expensive however as it requires a location-enabled WLAN, location tracking services through the Cisco MSE, the third-party gateway, and a shim on the mobile handset. Agito Networks is the primary vendor of this technology at the moment.

Jonathan Schulenberg Mon, 01/25/2010 - 11:42

Call Routing > Mobility Configuration is part of Mobile Voice Access (MVA). This is also part of Unified Mobility and is covered in the Features and Services document I linked previously.

A dual-mode phone has multiple definitions. Most GSM phones (and CDMA for that matter) are dual- or tri-mode in the cellular frequencies they support. Dual-mode in the cellular industry means a very different thing than dual-mode in the IT industry. I try to always specify 802.11/cellular dual-mode for clarity. For the purposes of roaming between cellular/802.11 frequencies, the list is very specific as it requires a shim on the handset to work. You cannot say that any 802.11/cellular dual-mode phone will work. The iPhone is probably the most glaring example of this at the moment due to the closed platform.

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