WLC code upgrade path questions

Answered Question
Mar 4th, 2010

We running WCS 6.0.132(lastest) and our controllers are on 4.2.130, we now want to upgrade to keep up with the times, but don't want to change over to capwap yet.

Question1:What's the latest LWAPP release code??

Question2:Whats the differences between 4.2.207 (cisco's support page says this is the latest release) but there's even releases with much higher versions ie 6.0 how does this work it's very confusing to workout an upgrade path

Cheers

I have this problem too.
0 votes
Correct Answer by rob.huffman about 6 years 9 months ago

Hi Tyrone,

I'm not an expert on Versioning but here are some basic details in response

to your query

4.2.207 is the latest release on the 4.2 Train and is probably an excellent choice

if you are avoiding CAPWAP for the time being. You will see in the link below that

there are multiple "simultaneous" Trains for the WLC (and most Cisco products). People

were not huge fans of the early 5.x Trains (quite buggy) and CAPWAP was introduced

in 5.2 and forward so this is why 4.2.207 seems like a good fit for you

In controller software release 5.2 or later, Cisco lightweight access points use the IETF standard Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points protocol (CAPWAP) in order to communicate between the controller and other lightweight access points on the network. Controller software releases prior to 5.2 use the Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP) for these communications.

CAPWAP, which is based on LWAPP, is a standard, interoperable protocol that enables a controller to manage a collection of wireless access points. CAPWAP is being implemented in controller software release 5.2 for these reasons:

    *

      To provide an upgrade path from Cisco products that use LWAPP to next-generation Cisco products that use CAPWAP
    *

      To manage RFID readers and similar devices
    *

      To enable controllers to interoperate with third-party access points in the future

LWAPP-enabled access points can discover and join a CAPWAP controller, and conversion to a CAPWAP controller is seamless. For example, the controller discovery process and the firmware downloading process when you use CAPWAP are the same as when you use LWAPP. The one exception is for Layer 2 deployments, which are not supported by CAPWAP.

You can deploy CAPWAP controllers and LWAPP controllers on the same network. The CAPWAP-enabled software allows access points to join either a controller that runs CAPWAP or LWAPP. The only exception is the Cisco Aironet 1140 Series Access Point, which supports only CAPWAP and therefore joins only controllers that run CAPWAP. For example, an 1130 series access point can join a controller that runs either CAPWAP or LWAPP whereas an 1140 series access point can join only a controller that runs CAPWAP.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6366/products_qanda_item09186a008064a991.shtml

4.2.207 was released 24/Jul/2009 which does make it  the second newest version available in any train.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6366/prod_release_notes_list.html

Cheers!

Rob

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Correct Answer
rob.huffman Thu, 03/04/2010 - 11:13

Hi Tyrone,

I'm not an expert on Versioning but here are some basic details in response

to your query

4.2.207 is the latest release on the 4.2 Train and is probably an excellent choice

if you are avoiding CAPWAP for the time being. You will see in the link below that

there are multiple "simultaneous" Trains for the WLC (and most Cisco products). People

were not huge fans of the early 5.x Trains (quite buggy) and CAPWAP was introduced

in 5.2 and forward so this is why 4.2.207 seems like a good fit for you

In controller software release 5.2 or later, Cisco lightweight access points use the IETF standard Control and Provisioning of Wireless Access Points protocol (CAPWAP) in order to communicate between the controller and other lightweight access points on the network. Controller software releases prior to 5.2 use the Lightweight Access Point Protocol (LWAPP) for these communications.

CAPWAP, which is based on LWAPP, is a standard, interoperable protocol that enables a controller to manage a collection of wireless access points. CAPWAP is being implemented in controller software release 5.2 for these reasons:

    *

      To provide an upgrade path from Cisco products that use LWAPP to next-generation Cisco products that use CAPWAP
    *

      To manage RFID readers and similar devices
    *

      To enable controllers to interoperate with third-party access points in the future

LWAPP-enabled access points can discover and join a CAPWAP controller, and conversion to a CAPWAP controller is seamless. For example, the controller discovery process and the firmware downloading process when you use CAPWAP are the same as when you use LWAPP. The one exception is for Layer 2 deployments, which are not supported by CAPWAP.

You can deploy CAPWAP controllers and LWAPP controllers on the same network. The CAPWAP-enabled software allows access points to join either a controller that runs CAPWAP or LWAPP. The only exception is the Cisco Aironet 1140 Series Access Point, which supports only CAPWAP and therefore joins only controllers that run CAPWAP. For example, an 1130 series access point can join a controller that runs either CAPWAP or LWAPP whereas an 1140 series access point can join only a controller that runs CAPWAP.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6366/products_qanda_item09186a008064a991.shtml

4.2.207 was released 24/Jul/2009 which does make it  the second newest version available in any train.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6366/prod_release_notes_list.html

Cheers!

Rob

richardboldy Sun, 09/05/2010 - 11:29

Hi Rob,

I've come across something in CCNP SWITCH exam that touches on this but there is no clear answer in the Cisco press book.

Can you explain what you mean by Layer 2 deployments are not supported by CAPWAP?

Do you mean that if i only have switches between my AP's and WLC I can't use CAPWAP?

Obviously I can't divulge the exact exam question but in theory I'm interested to know exactly what would happen to my network if I chose to upgrade my WLC's to 5.2 code or higher where the topology here is just an Extended Services Set with 3 cells. i.e. just a Layer2 domain. Access ports at the access layer and 802.1q from distribution switch to WLC.

Thanks

Rich./

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