Questions about using CUVA Cameras

Answered Question
Mar 12th, 2010

Hello, I recently implemented CUVA into our enviornments and I had a few

questions.

We have a Cisco Call Manager version 4.1. The other day I found that if I install CUVA (and the camera) on a computer and enable video capabilities for the device, we can use the cameras for video conferencing. This is a new system to me, so I am still doing discovery. So, these are my questions.

1). I am a bit suprised that it didn't work, because I thought that we had to have licensing on the Call Manager. We had never tried this in the past. Is this a licensed feature? If so, where would I view the installed licenses. I am using the web gui to manage the call manager. Is it possible that it comes with 5 licenses, but you have to install more to exceed that number?

2). It's my understanding that when a Cisco phone called another Cisco phone, the call manager just sets up the call. The actual call is from phone to phone and the call manager isn't processing that traffic. Is this true for the video traffic as well?

3). Right now we are just using the cameras for person-to-person. But, we have two sites and I expect that we will want to use this to connect the conference rooms. Any recommendations on hardware to purchase?

4). These questions address licensing and performance concerns. Are there other concerns that I should be thinking about going into this?

Any suggestions would be great. I am going into new territory and would appreciate any guidance.

Thanks,

Ben

I have this problem too.
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Correct Answer by Aaron Harrison about 6 years 8 months ago

Hi

1) Licensing of CUVA isn't enforced on CCM like phone licenses are (and a few other features such as mobility via the DLUs). You purchase it per endpoint. As you don't really configure the CUVA endpoints on CCM it would be difficult to track I guess due to it's dynamic nature (you may have only 10 CUVA clients, but if using EM you would still likely want to enable all phoens on the system for video capabilities to allow for roaming laptop users etc).

2) Yep, video streams are point-to-point between the end points, they don't go via CCM. Just like audio...

3) Well.. CUVA is generally intended to be used on a desktop. The cameras aren't really suited to covering rooms, and the mandatory PC daisy chained off the phone might make it difficult. Really you want to look at a proper video endpoint - so from Cisco that would be a small TPS, but you could get another manufacturer's conferencing kit integrated into CCM. There are lots of options here, probably best to talk to your Cisco partner...

4) Depends - if it's just desktop-desktop video you want, CUVA can be ideal. Just be aware of the bandwidth requirements, and test any hardware you have with it to make sure it's compatible (i.e. if you have a standard laptop model with a camera built in, test compatibility with that). If you want multi-party conferences this requires extra hardware (i.e. to have a three-party active speaker conference you had to have an MCU or MeetingPlace Express, which is now EOL).

Hope this helps

Aaron

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Correct Answer
Aaron Harrison Mon, 03/15/2010 - 07:47

Hi

1) Licensing of CUVA isn't enforced on CCM like phone licenses are (and a few other features such as mobility via the DLUs). You purchase it per endpoint. As you don't really configure the CUVA endpoints on CCM it would be difficult to track I guess due to it's dynamic nature (you may have only 10 CUVA clients, but if using EM you would still likely want to enable all phoens on the system for video capabilities to allow for roaming laptop users etc).

2) Yep, video streams are point-to-point between the end points, they don't go via CCM. Just like audio...

3) Well.. CUVA is generally intended to be used on a desktop. The cameras aren't really suited to covering rooms, and the mandatory PC daisy chained off the phone might make it difficult. Really you want to look at a proper video endpoint - so from Cisco that would be a small TPS, but you could get another manufacturer's conferencing kit integrated into CCM. There are lots of options here, probably best to talk to your Cisco partner...

4) Depends - if it's just desktop-desktop video you want, CUVA can be ideal. Just be aware of the bandwidth requirements, and test any hardware you have with it to make sure it's compatible (i.e. if you have a standard laptop model with a camera built in, test compatibility with that). If you want multi-party conferences this requires extra hardware (i.e. to have a three-party active speaker conference you had to have an MCU or MeetingPlace Express, which is now EOL).

Hope this helps

Aaron

Please rate helpful posts...

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