Need to give one ip for internet users

Unanswered Question
Mar 30th, 2010

Server need to acces from out side :: 192.168.1.2

Public IP Address Assigned by NAT :: 220.225.36.8 from one ISP( WAN !)

                                                        124.25.86.9   FRom another ISP(WAN 2)

Problem Facing ::  Internet USers (( Acessing the server by these IP but one link goes down( Our side ) They have to change the IP Manualy in their          application

Wanted  to give : one ip for the user , If one Link goes down in Our side the trafic should come through other No need to change the IP manually

So kindly Provide me a solution

Biju.A

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s-moriarty Tue, 03/30/2010 - 09:49

In addition to load balancing would they also want to consider accessing by name instead of IP?

Paolo Bevilacqua Thu, 04/01/2010 - 03:48

Have you read the whole discussion?

By name or address, there is NO way to do what you want.

s-moriarty Thu, 04/01/2010 - 08:02

Think of this problem as you need to give one NAME for internet users. As we all agree you can't give one IP as this limits availability and is at the mercy of your circuit availability. By changing focus the issue then becomes how do you resolve that name and what IP will it resolve to? This changes the scope of the problem and gives you some options.

If you can do this by name (which is the optimum way) you are going to need to implement a global load balancing solution and you are going to want to be in a position where you can manage your DNS. In essence the problem is how the client is configured to access your application. You definitely can't do this if you are trying to access services by IP address only. If this is a requirement then it is a done deal and you are going to have to continue to work with what you have.

If you are in fact stuck with using IP addresses then you can revert to a simple solution using a hosts file on the machines in question. Windows (assuming they are using Windows) will resolve a name using the hosts file before it tries to contact a nameserver. If you try to access www.example.com and you have two entries in the hosts file it will try each of these in succession until one works. If you don't have alot of end-users affected by your problem you are presenting this is probably the easiest and cheapest way to go about this. You can also load balance users across the two circuits by alternating the ordering of the addresses in the hosts file.

On the other hand with a GSS (or any global load balancing solution for that matter) being authoritative for your namespace you will be able to put in place the mechanisms you need to affect how the name for your service is resolved. The GSS device or devices do not have to be offsite. They just have to be able to get out through your internet connections. Once you introducde any global load balancing solution into the architecture you increase by orders of magnitude the way you can affect traffic reaching your server. This will be helpful in instances of circuit maintenance, equipment maintenance, physical relocation, introducing new servers, redirecting users based on geographic location, etc.

Just make sure you consider the scope of your problem as you are starting to move up to a more advanced solution and it will take some planning and some money. Not sure how many users you are talking about. If it is a small number then a host file modification will do the trick. You do not even need to add a legitimate domain to the hosts file to make this work either as Windows is just going resolve the name to whatever addresses you have configured.

ALSO - please be mindful of all of the additional info Jon and Paolo have provided. In the end this may be too much to tackle so take it offsite to a cheap hosted solution and save yourself alot of trouble.

AND - my public apologies to Paolo! I do not mean any disrespect as this discussion has become lively to say the least and I was probably a bit too blunt due to major lack of sleep.

Shawn

Paolo Bevilacqua Thu, 04/01/2010 - 08:06

Shawn, there is no problem.

When there is no agreement or understanding, discussing matters in technical detail may help and that is what we are doing here.

Paolo Bevilacqua Tue, 03/30/2010 - 10:30

There is really no solution.

You would need to get your own address space and BGP, that is very complicated and expensive, consequently most people put servers in datacenters, that "never" go down.

s-moriarty Tue, 03/30/2010 - 10:36

How about using the GSS in addition to a local load balancing device? This seems to present a solution to this problem. There are other technical details involved, but GSLB is something that can help here.

Paolo Bevilacqua Tue, 03/30/2010 - 10:41

How about using the GSS in addition to a local load balancing device?  This seems to present a solution to this problem. There are other  technical details involved, but GSLB is something that can help here.

Not sure what a GSS is, but whatever it is, would not help.

In the internet, when and address unreachable, it is, and no balancer can make it work.

s-moriarty Tue, 03/30/2010 - 10:49

It is the Cisco Global Site Selector. Oh it would work - I promise

Paolo Bevilacqua Tue, 03/30/2010 - 10:57

It is the Cisco Global Site Selector. Oh it would work - I promise

Beside that these are products aimed at datacenter rather than casual server hosting, please explain us how a when a regualr ISP circuit (no BGP ) that terminate address X.X.X.X is down, how exactly anyone from the internet can still reach X.X.X.X

s-moriarty Tue, 03/30/2010 - 11:00

Think about the client access method - forget about BGP and addressing. That is not the problem here.

Paolo Bevilacqua Tue, 03/30/2010 - 11:28

No, indeed exactly that is the problem.

Sorry, seems like you really don't know what you are talking about - "client access method" ???

Jon Marshall Tue, 03/30/2010 - 12:50

If they access by IP address you can't make this work.

If they access by DNS name and there are 2 links coming into your site then as s-moriarty said a GSS would do the job because it can dynamically hand out a different IP for the same DNS name based on the availability of the IP address.

Edit - you do still need a load-balancer which informs the GSS of the availability of the IP address. As Paolo points out this would be an expensive solution but it depends on your budget/requirements.

You can still face problems with DNS caching though so it is not fullproof.

Jon

Paolo Bevilacqua Tue, 03/30/2010 - 13:03

You don't need GSS for dynamically built DNS replies, that is something any linux scripter can do.

Problem is that probably the customer will want the magic box in their house, that in turn poses the problem of which address to use to reach it, so you're back to square one in vicious loop.

Bottom line: if you want redundancy, either spend big money for BGP, or bring the servers to an hosting center.

Jon Marshall Tue, 03/30/2010 - 14:10

Paolo

You don't need GSS for dynamically built DNS replies, that is something any linux scripter can do.

Agreed but the GSS does a whole lot more and to be fair you have often argued for using professional solutions which i'm not sure a linux script is.

Problem is that probably the customer will want the magic box in their house, that in turn poses the problem of which address to use to reach it, so you're back to square one in vicious loop.

Totally agreed and something i overlooked (+5). The GSS would indeed need to be hosted offsite for it to function as intended so you are looking at some offsite hosting service for the GSS at least.

Jon

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