Bandwidth allocation for incoming WAN traffic

Answered Question
May 1st, 2010

Hi all,


At the moment I'm using 6-7 gateways for our Internet connection for different traffics. I was thinking of combining all these links to one high speed link but before doing it I need to make sure if there is anyway that I can assign a minimum bandwidth to incoming traffic. For example I want to allocate 10% to SMTP, 10% to http,...

I know that I can do it with MQC for outgoing traffic but not sure how to do it for incoming terrific as well.

Thanks for your help in advance.


Regards,

Rez

Correct Answer by Reza Sharifi about 6 years 10 months ago

Hi Reza,


Depending on the product and IOS version, you can do ingress queuing using the ASR-1000 series.


Ingress traffic can be classified and scheduled at the SIP10, so the high-priority traffic reaches the ESP10 before any other traffic. The classification could be done based on the priority of the ingress packets. No ingress remarking is done by default. The ingress packets classification is based on 802.1p (Ethernet priority), Multiprotocol Label Switching experimental bits for priority (MPLS EXP), and IP Precedence or IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) for both IPv4 and IPv6. Priority is then determined based on this classification. Cisco ASR 1000 Series Routers have a specific non-MQC command-line interface (CLI) to customize this classification; for example: plim qos input map ip dscp queue < low-latency | 0>. In the case of Ethernet, you can configure this classification per VLAN.


Here is the link to the document:


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps9343/solution_overview_c22-449961_ps9343_Product_Solution_Overview.html


BTW, nice name


HTH

Reza

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Correct Answer
Reza Sharifi Sat, 05/01/2010 - 21:28

Hi Reza,


Depending on the product and IOS version, you can do ingress queuing using the ASR-1000 series.


Ingress traffic can be classified and scheduled at the SIP10, so the high-priority traffic reaches the ESP10 before any other traffic. The classification could be done based on the priority of the ingress packets. No ingress remarking is done by default. The ingress packets classification is based on 802.1p (Ethernet priority), Multiprotocol Label Switching experimental bits for priority (MPLS EXP), and IP Precedence or IP differentiated services code point (DSCP) for both IPv4 and IPv6. Priority is then determined based on this classification. Cisco ASR 1000 Series Routers have a specific non-MQC command-line interface (CLI) to customize this classification; for example: plim qos input map ip dscp queue < low-latency | 0>. In the case of Ethernet, you can configure this classification per VLAN.


Here is the link to the document:


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps9343/solution_overview_c22-449961_ps9343_Product_Solution_Overview.html


BTW, nice name


HTH

Reza

reza_nashvi Sat, 05/01/2010 - 23:10

Hi Reza,


Thanks for the reply. I'm new to Cisco world but after some research I think ASR-1000 is too expensive for our company. I really doubt it to get budget for something in this range. Is there any other workaround?


It is the best name . Isn't it?


Regards,

Rez

sean_evershed Sun, 05/02/2010 - 02:43

Rez,

Have you considered policing your in-coming traffic?

It can be used to assign a maximum bandwidth value to different classes of traffic. Traffic is either dropped or re-marked if it exceeds the set parameters.

However this approach may not suit your requirement to guarantee a minimum rate.


See below the relavent section in the QoS 12.4T Configuration guide.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/qos/configuration/guide/cnfig_traffic_polcng_ps6441_TSD_Products_Configuration_Guide_Chapter.html


What model routers are you using now?

reza_nashvi Mon, 05/03/2010 - 05:07

Hi Sean,


Thanks for the reply. At the moment I'm using 3825 and I'm happy with it. I have a half dozen Internet connection which being used for different traffic(like all VPNs come through one gateway or SMTP traffic another gateway,...). But I have a lot of problem to manage them and also my servers are full of static routes(it's a mess I know and I inherited it from previous network administrator).

In regards to the policing, as you mentioned I won't be able to guarantee a minimum rate. But I think I only have two ways, Reza's solution which is a bit expensive or have my fingers crossed that policing will do the job.


Regards,

Rez

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