WCS-WLAN Override vs AP Groups

Answered Question
May 7th, 2010
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We are using WCS ver 6.0.170.0 and WLC ver 4.2.207.0.

What is the best method to use for limiting SSID propagation ie WLAN override or AP Groups?

Correct Answer by Rob Huffman about 7 years 3 weeks ago

Hi Andrew,


With WLC 4.2 .x.x you would be using WLAN override I believe



Enabling  WLAN Override


By default, access points transmit all defined WLANs on  the controller. However, you can use the WLAN Override option to select  which WLANs are transmitted and which ones are not on a per access point  basis. For example, you can use WLAN override to control where in the  network the guest WLAN is transmitted or you can use it to disable a  specific WLAN in a certain area of the network.


From this  doc;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/controller/4.0/configuration/guide/c40wlan.html#wp1114777


Once  you create a new WLAN, the WLAN > Edit page for the new WLAN  appears. In this page you can define various parameters specific to this  WLAN including General Policies, RADIUS Servers, Security Policies, and  802.1x Parameters.


**Check Admin Status under General Policies to enable the  WLAN. If you want the AP to broadcast the SSID in its beacon frames,  check Broadcast SSID.


Note: You can configure up to sixteen WLANs on  the controller. The Cisco WLAN Solution can control up to sixteen WLANs  for Lightweight APs. Each WLAN has a separate WLAN ID (1 through 16), a  separate WLAN SSID (WLAN name), and can be assigned unique security  policies. Lightweight APs broadcast all active Cisco WLAN Solution WLAN  SSIDs and enforce the policies that you define for each WLAN.


From this  good doc;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk722/tk809/technologies_configuration_example09186a0080665d18.shtml#c3





In 5.x and 6.x  versions you will use AP Groups, because in WLC 5.x versions, WLAN  Override has been replaced with the "AP Groups" feature;


Creating  Access Point Groups


After all access points have joined the controller, you  can create up to 150 access point groups and assign up to 16 WLANs to  each group. Each access point advertises only the enabled WLANs that  belong to its access point group. The access point does not advertise  disabled WLANs in its access point group or WLANs that belong to another  group.



http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/controller/5.2/configuration/guide/c52wlan.html#wp1128591



To learn  more about AP Groups check out George's excellent video


http://www.my80211.com/cisco-labs/2009/3/22/cisco-ap-group-nugget.html



Hope this  helps!

Rob

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Rob Huffman Fri, 05/07/2010 - 08:44
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Hi Andrew,


With WLC 4.2 .x.x you would be using WLAN override I believe



Enabling  WLAN Override


By default, access points transmit all defined WLANs on  the controller. However, you can use the WLAN Override option to select  which WLANs are transmitted and which ones are not on a per access point  basis. For example, you can use WLAN override to control where in the  network the guest WLAN is transmitted or you can use it to disable a  specific WLAN in a certain area of the network.


From this  doc;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/controller/4.0/configuration/guide/c40wlan.html#wp1114777


Once  you create a new WLAN, the WLAN > Edit page for the new WLAN  appears. In this page you can define various parameters specific to this  WLAN including General Policies, RADIUS Servers, Security Policies, and  802.1x Parameters.


**Check Admin Status under General Policies to enable the  WLAN. If you want the AP to broadcast the SSID in its beacon frames,  check Broadcast SSID.


Note: You can configure up to sixteen WLANs on  the controller. The Cisco WLAN Solution can control up to sixteen WLANs  for Lightweight APs. Each WLAN has a separate WLAN ID (1 through 16), a  separate WLAN SSID (WLAN name), and can be assigned unique security  policies. Lightweight APs broadcast all active Cisco WLAN Solution WLAN  SSIDs and enforce the policies that you define for each WLAN.


From this  good doc;


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk722/tk809/technologies_configuration_example09186a0080665d18.shtml#c3





In 5.x and 6.x  versions you will use AP Groups, because in WLC 5.x versions, WLAN  Override has been replaced with the "AP Groups" feature;


Creating  Access Point Groups


After all access points have joined the controller, you  can create up to 150 access point groups and assign up to 16 WLANs to  each group. Each access point advertises only the enabled WLANs that  belong to its access point group. The access point does not advertise  disabled WLANs in its access point group or WLANs that belong to another  group.



http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/wireless/controller/5.2/configuration/guide/c52wlan.html#wp1128591



To learn  more about AP Groups check out George's excellent video


http://www.my80211.com/cisco-labs/2009/3/22/cisco-ap-group-nugget.html



Hope this  helps!

Rob

George Stefanick Fri, 05/07/2010 - 17:07
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Thanks Rob for the shout out ...

smith606306 Tue, 05/11/2010 - 03:53
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We are using Wlan override and occasionally we notice that the WLAN IDs and WLAN profiles get mixed up.

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