10 Mb's half duplex on 1840

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May 11th, 2010
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Router is a Cisco 1840 Series.  Our ISP controls the router,  The router is set to 10 Mb's half duplex.  Is this a common thing for the routers to come from the ISP's configured like this?  If so, is there some reason why they do this?  The half duplex setting really puzzles me.  Why wouldn't it be set at full duplex?

I'm wondering if the reasoning is, well it collapses down to a T1 which is running at 1.5 Mb's, so 10 Mb's is fast enough, why run at 100 Mb's.

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Ganesh Hariharan Tue, 05/11/2010 - 22:46
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Router is a Cisco 1840 Series. Our ISP controls the router,  The router is set to 10 Mb's half duplex.  Is this a common thing for the routers to come from the ISP's configured like this?  If so, is there some reason why they do this? The half duplex setting really puzzles me.  Why wouldn't it be set at full duplex?

I'm wondering if the reasoning is, well it collapses down to a T1 which is running at 1.5 Mb's, so 10 Mb's is fast enough, why run at 100 Mb's.

Hi,


Because half duplex will work in just about all situations. If it's set to full duplex and the other device is a hub or a device that doesn't support full duplex then you'd have no connectivity.


So can set full duplex with 100 Mbps at both the end side in coordination with your ISP.


Hope to Help !!


Ganesh.H


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paolo bevilacqua Wed, 05/12/2010 - 03:54
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Because half duplex will work in just about all situations.

Incorrect, to the contrary a side set to half-duplex will experience excessive collisions and aborts when connected to a full-duplex station.


If it's set  to full duplex and the other device is a hub or a device that doesn't  support full duplex then you'd have no connectivity.

Incorrect two times. First, hubs are half-duplex by definition, second, mismatching half and full-duplex devices cause problems, but not loss of connectivity.

Ganesh Hariharan Wed, 05/12/2010 - 21:56
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Because half duplex will work in just about all situations.

Incorrect, to the contrary a side set to half-duplex will experience excessive collisions and aborts when connected to a full-duplex station.


If it's set  to full duplex and the other device is a hub or a device that doesn't  support full duplex then you'd have no connectivity.

Incorect two times. First, hubs are by half-duplex by definition, second, mismatching half and full-duplex devices cause problems, but not loss of connectivity.

p.bevilacquaP.bevilacqua,


Thanks for giving light on my view regarding half duplex and full duplex communication between devices and there consequences.


Ganesh.H

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