SubFlow best practice advice please

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Jun 23rd, 2010
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I am new to IPCCX scripting and would like some advice on whether multiple SubFlows are a good idea.

We have 16 small Call Centers that all have very basic scripts. I plan on adding a Holiday/Emergency Closure SubFlow to all of them and I would like to add a few additional features as well.


I plan on adding:

·         Position in Queue

·         Expected Wait Time

·         If more than X number of callers in queue, inform the caller that they cannot be helped at this time and to call back later.

·         If Expected Wait Time exceeds closing time, inform the caller that they cannot be helped at this time and to call back later.

(I know the last two sound pretty harsh, but it’s government, and there is no budget to hire more operators. I think it is better to let the callers know early that they need to call back, than to have them wait for two hours just to be disconnected. And no, this is NOT the 911 call center!!!   LOL)

My questions are:

Would it be ok to add each feature as a SubFlow? Or could there possibly be performance or other issues by having so many SubFlows in one script.

My other option is to add each item internal to each script, but that would be a lot to tackle 16 times…

Lastly, is there a best practice on how short a script should be for performance? I know you can’t have one that is longer than 1000 steps, but should I try to keep the step count below a certain number?


Any advice or insights would be greatly appreciated…

Thanks,

Doug.

Correct Answer by Anthony Holloway about 6 years 10 months ago

You have been given some good advice, but I feel like your question went unanswered.


So, in my opinion is... yes, put all that common scripting into Subflows, and leverage them.  This is exactly why they are there.


Also, 1000 steps is not a script step maximum for design, it's a limit of execution.  You could have a script that has 4 steps in it, which can exceed this maximum, and conversely, a 1500 step script that could never possibly execute more than 600 steps, depending on the path the caller takes.

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Steven Griffin Fri, 06/25/2010 - 08:57
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Doug,


Most of the items your list are included natively in UCCX.  Use the Get Reporting Statistic step to obtain the expected wait time, position in queue, and total queue time information. The current time-of-day can be had using a Time variable.  You'll need to do some work to convert the values into something you can play to the calling party as a prompt, a subflow is great for that, but you shouldn't need to reinvent the wheel.


Take the time to draw out the call flow for each of the 16 contact centers on paper or in MS Visio. If your 16 call flows are very similar in the way they operate, consider a master script that just changes the prompts/menus based on the number dialed.  Leverage XML or a database (if you have premium licensing) to pull in the relevant information you need for each DNIS.  You may find you can streamline the entire system, or at least a good portion of it, without it becoming 16 unwieldy applications.


Steven

Correct Answer
Anthony Holloway Mon, 06/28/2010 - 05:48
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You have been given some good advice, but I feel like your question went unanswered.


So, in my opinion is... yes, put all that common scripting into Subflows, and leverage them.  This is exactly why they are there.


Also, 1000 steps is not a script step maximum for design, it's a limit of execution.  You could have a script that has 4 steps in it, which can exceed this maximum, and conversely, a 1500 step script that could never possibly execute more than 600 steps, depending on the path the caller takes.

dvdavis Mon, 06/28/2010 - 06:37
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Thanks Anthony!

Yes it was all good advice, but my concern was adding too many Sub Flows. I just wasn’t sure what the limit would be before impacting performance. 

But you don’t sound concerned about adding 5, so I will go ahead and start adding those.

Thanks again!

Steven Griffin Mon, 06/28/2010 - 07:20
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Five SubFlows should be fine. If you think about it, SubFlows are equivalent to function calls.  I don't recall there being a limit, technically, to the number of SubFlows you can add to a script.   This stands to reason as most programming languages rely on function calls to do their work.

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