1260 access point 5GHz antenna options???

Answered Question
Jul 2nd, 2010

Scenario is, I have a huge warehouse. I want to use 1260 Access Points on walls and ceilings. ceiling is 15m high and racks are 3m high.

What 5 GHz directional patch can I use? Is there a better option?

So far with some planning, I want to have directional antennas around the walls directing signal between racks. I want to fill the dead spots with ceiling mounted APs and antennas (ideally directional patches).

Any advise would be warmly received.

I have this problem too.
0 votes
Correct Answer by Leo Laohoo about 6 years 4 months ago

Hi Gary,

You're getting a +5 from me.  Thanks for pointing this out.  It's very, very useful.

Back to your question about directional antennae, you could use the AIR-ANT5140V and mount it on a wall.  I wouldn't use the AIR-ANT5160V because you need to get the correct height.  Have a look at the horizontal foot print and you'll see.

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Leo Laohoo Fri, 07/02/2010 - 16:21

The following link will give you a variety of antennaes that are compatible with the 1260.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps469/products_data_sheets_list.html

Have a read of the "Cisco Aironet Antennas and Accessories Reference Guide" first.  Remember that the 1260 has three antennaes for both the 2.4Ghz and 5Ghz so in some cases you may need to buy three per radio.

The latest offer from Cisco is the dual-band AIR-ANT2451NV which is a single unit suitable for the 1250 and 1260.  It has six RP-TNC pig-tails.

Just be wary of the following rule-of-thumbs:

Antennas transmit and receive radio signals which are susceptible to RF obstructions and common sources of interference that can reduce throughput and range of the device to which they are connected. Follow these guidelines to ensure the best possible performance:


•Keep the antenna away from metal obstructions such as heating and air-conditioning ducts, large ceiling trusses, building superstructures, and major power cabling runs. If necessary, use a rigid conduit to lower the antenna away from these obstructions.
•The density of the materials used in a building’s construction determines the number of walls the signal can pass through and still maintain adequate signal strength. Consider the following before choosing the location for your antenna:


–Signals penetrate paper and vinyl walls with little change to signal strength.
–Signals penetrate only one or two solid and pre-cast concrete walls without degrading signal strength.
–Signals penetrate three or four concrete and wood block walls without degrading signal strength.
–Signals penetrate five or six walls constructed of drywall or wood without degrading signal strength.
–Signals will likely reflect off a thick metal wall and may not penetrate it at all.
–Signals will likely reflect off a chain link fence or wire mesh spaced between 1 and 1 1/2 in. (2.5 and 3.8 cm). The fence acts as a harmonic reflector that blocks the signal.


•Install the antenna away from microwave ovens and 2-GHz cordless phones. These products can cause signal interference because they operate in the same frequency range as the device to which your antenna is connected.

Don't be tempted to use signal/radio boosters.  The APs and antennaes weren't designed for that scenario.

5.0Ghz was designed for high bandwidth but small "footprint" or range but 2.4Ghz has a larger range.  So you may want to consider this.

If you are really looking at directional antennae just make sure look at the horizontal and vertical radiation patterns found in the  "Cisco Aironet Antennas and Accessories Reference Guide".

Hope this helps.

Please don't forget to rate useful posts.  Thanks.

garrsmith Sun, 07/04/2010 - 01:21

Thanks for the info.

The issue still stands though - There doesn't seem to be a directional patch antenna for the 5GHz on the 1260. 

Leo Laohoo Sun, 07/04/2010 - 15:20

AIR-ANT5195P (minimum one to maximum to three) & AIR-ANT5170P (minimum one) are candidates.

garrsmith Sun, 07/04/2010 - 15:32

I was led to believe that the antenna for 1260 on 5GHz had to be 6dBi or lower. Am I wrong?

Thanks for the info up to now!

Leo Laohoo Mon, 07/05/2010 - 15:09

I  was led to believe that the antenna for 1260 on 5GHz had to be 6dBi or lower.

Never heard of this before.  And it sure doesn't make any sense to me.

AIR-ANT5160V-R

This is an ONMI-directional antennae.  Your initial query was for a DIRECTIONAL antennae.
garrsmith Mon, 07/05/2010 - 15:20

I will try to dig out the pdf which says about the 6dBi rule. In fact, I think it was in your first post where you gave a link for N antennas. I will check.

The antenna I found, AIR-ANT5160NP-R is different to one one you mentioned. You are right that the AIR-ANT5160V-R is omni.

Thanks,

Gary

garrsmith Tue, 07/06/2010 - 01:36

Look at page 3 of the attached pdf. It mentions there that the antenna

must be 6dBi or less. I am not sure if I am interperating it wrong.. What do you think??

2.4-GHz Directional Antenna Part Numbers

Quantity

Required Description Gain

AIR-ANT2460NP-R 1 Patch antenna: indoor/

outdoor, wall mount

6 dBi

AIR-ANT2485P-R* 3 Patch antenna: indoor/

outdoor, wall mount

8.5 dBi

AIR-ANT2410Y-R* 3 Yagi antenna: indoor/

outdoor, mast mount

10 dBi

*Not approved for use with 1260 Series and 3500e Series (must be 6 dBi or less)

Thanks,

Gary

Correct Answer
Leo Laohoo Tue, 07/06/2010 - 14:46

Hi Gary,

You're getting a +5 from me.  Thanks for pointing this out.  It's very, very useful.

Back to your question about directional antennae, you could use the AIR-ANT5140V and mount it on a wall.  I wouldn't use the AIR-ANT5160V because you need to get the correct height.  Have a look at the horizontal foot print and you'll see.

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