RD (Rogue Detector) or RLDP (Rogue Location Discovery Protocol)

Answered Question
Jul 9th, 2010
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Hi all,


Cisco documentaion states that there are two ways for detecting Rogues.


Rogue Detector Access Point

You can make an AP operate as a rogue detector, which allows it to be placed on a trunk port so that it can hear all wired-side connected VLANs. It proceeds to find the client on the wired subnet on all the VLANs. The rogue detector AP listens for Address Resolution Protocol (ARP) packets in order to determine the Layer 2 addresses of identified rogue clients or rogue APs sent by the controller. If a Layer 2 address that matches is found, the controller generates an alarm that identifies the rogue AP or client as a threat. This alarm indicates that the rogue was seen on the wired network.


Rogue Location Discovery Protocol (RLDP)

RLDP is an active approach, which is used when rogue AP has no authentication (Open Authentication) configured. This mode, which is disabled by default, instructs an active AP to move to the rogue channel and connect to the rogue as a client. During this time, the active AP sends deauthentication messages to all connected clients and then shuts down the radio interface. Then, it will associate to the rogue AP as a client.

The AP then tries to obtain an IP address from the rogue AP and forwards a User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packet (port 6352) that contains the local AP and rogue connection information to the controller through the rogue AP. If the controller receives this packet, the alarm is set to notify the network administrator that a rogue AP was discovered on the wired network with the RLDP feature.



So how do you turn on the latter (RLDP)?



Many thx indeed

Ken




The following modes of operations exist:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/hw/wireless/ps430/products_qanda_item09186a00806a4da3.shtml


Q. What are the different modes in which a lightweight access point (LAP) can operate?

A. An LAP can operate in any of these modes:

•Local mode—This is the default mode of operation. When an LAP is placed into local mode, the AP will transmit on the normally assigned channel. However, the AP also monitors all other channels in the band over a period of 180 seconds to scan each of the other channels for 60ms during the non-transmit time. During this time, the AP performs noise floor measurements, measures interference, and scans for IDS events.

•REAP mode—Remote Edge Access Point (REAP) mode enables an LAP to reside across a WAN link and still be able to communicate with the WLC and provide the functionality of a regular LAP. REAP mode is supported only on the 1030 LAPs.

•H-REAP Mode— H-REAP is a wireless solution for branch office and remote office deployments. H-REAP enables customers to configure and control access points (APs) in a branch or remote office from the corporate office through a WAN link without the need to deploy a controller in each office. H-REAPs can switch client data traffic locally and perform client authentication locally when the connection to the controller is lost. When connected to the controller, H-REAPs can also tunnel traffic back to the controller.

•Monitor mode—Monitor mode is a feature designed to allow specified LWAPP-enabled APs to exclude themselves from handling data traffic between clients and the infrastructure. They instead act as dedicated sensors for location based services (LBS), rogue access point detection, and intrusion detection (IDS). When APs are in Monitor mode they cannot serve clients and continuously cycle through all configured channels listening to each channel for approximately 60 ms.

Note: From the controller release 5.0, LWAPPs can also be configured in Location Optimized Monitor Mode (LOMM), which optimizes the monitoring and location calculation of RFID tags. For more information on this mode, refer to Cisco Unified Wireless Network Software Release 5.0.

Note: With controller release 5.2, the Location Optimized Monitor Mode (LOMM) section has been renamed Tracking Optimization, and the LOMM Enabled drop-down box has been renamed Enable Tracking Optimization.

Note: For more information on how to configure Tracking Optimization, read the Optimizing RFID Tracking on Access Points section.

•Rogue detector mode—LAPs that operate in Rogue Detector mode monitor the rogue APs. They do not transmit or contain rogue APs. The idea is that the rogue detector should be able to see all the VLANs in the network since rogue APs can be connected to any of the VLANs in the network (thus we connect it to a trunk port). The switch sends all the rogue AP/Client MAC address lists to the Rogue Detector (RD). The RD then forwards those up to the WLC in order to compare with the MACs of clients that the WLC APs have heard over the air. If MACs match, then the WLC knows the rogue AP to which those clients are connected is on the wired network.

•Sniffer mode—An LWAPP that operates in Sniffer mode functions as a sniffer and captures and forwards all the packets on a particular channel to a remote machine that runs Airopeek. These packets contain information on timestamp, signal strength, packet size and so on. The Sniffer feature can be enabled only if you run Airopeek, which is a third-party network analyzer software that supports decoding of data packets.

•Bridge Mode— Bridge mode is used when the access points are setup in a mesh environment and used to bridge between each other.

Correct Answer by John Cook about 6 years 10 months ago

Found this in another post here on the forum :


There are 3 ways to detect rogue Aps:


1. Ap in monitor mode (sits and scans all channels. Can detect rogue Aps under 30 seconds

2. RLDP (done passively from normal Aps. Can take up to 15 minutes to detect rogue AP)

3. Rogue Detector (looks for broadcast packets from wireless clients on wired network)


For case number 2, a normal AP would be one in local or h-reap connected mode that normally have clients attached, but that are going off channel occasionally to scan for rogues / noise.  The process of trying to validate that there is a network attached rogue (RDLP enabled) could likely be service interrupting depending on your AP layout.


-John

Correct Answer by John Cook about 6 years 10 months ago

You go to the security tab / wireless protection policies / rogue policies / general and enable it from there.


-John

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Correct Answer
John Cook Fri, 07/09/2010 - 05:33
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You go to the security tab / wireless protection policies / rogue policies / general and enable it from there.


-John

kfarrington Fri, 07/09/2010 - 06:06
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Hi John,


So if I turn this on, does that apply to ALL APs running in local mode? or do I need to set the AP into another mode?


Thx for the reply mate

Ken

John Cook Fri, 07/09/2010 - 07:03
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I believe it applies to all local mode and hreap AP's joined to the WLC.

kfarrington Fri, 07/09/2010 - 07:11
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Hi John,


Many thx once again.  You say you beleive?  so do we need a confirmation on this?


Man, many thx!!!!


Cheers

Ken

Correct Answer
John Cook Fri, 07/09/2010 - 08:02
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Found this in another post here on the forum :


There are 3 ways to detect rogue Aps:


1. Ap in monitor mode (sits and scans all channels. Can detect rogue Aps under 30 seconds

2. RLDP (done passively from normal Aps. Can take up to 15 minutes to detect rogue AP)

3. Rogue Detector (looks for broadcast packets from wireless clients on wired network)


For case number 2, a normal AP would be one in local or h-reap connected mode that normally have clients attached, but that are going off channel occasionally to scan for rogues / noise.  The process of trying to validate that there is a network attached rogue (RDLP enabled) could likely be service interrupting depending on your AP layout.


-John

kfarrington Fri, 07/09/2010 - 08:05
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Hi John,


That is great.  Many many thanks for the help.


Kindest regards,

Ken

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