Instance numbers following route maps

Answered Question
Jul 13th, 2010

I am working at a client site today, and am trying to prune some routes from one path,

and add them to another.  As I examine the configuration on this specific router, I come across the following:

route-map bgp-eigrp-rm permit 10
match ip address bgp-eigrp
!
route-map eigrp-bgp-rm permit 10
match ip address eigrp-bgp
!
route-map eigrp-bgp-rm deny 20

Can anyone tell me here what the 10's and 20"s mean on the end of each of these statments?  What do they pertain to?

Thanks

Kevin

I have this problem too.
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Correct Answer by Robert Taylor about 6 years 5 months ago

Each route-map can have multiple sequences to it, which dictate the order by which you move through a route-map.

Once the item (packet, route prefix, etc) being sent through the route-map finds a matching statement, it will take the action dicated in that specific sequence, and then immediately exit the route-map.

For example, in this route-map:

route-map eigrp-bgp-rm permit 10
match ip address  eigrp-bgp
!
route-map eigrp-bgp-rm deny 20

If a route DOES match the "eigrp-bgp" access-list, then it will be allowed (this route-map is probably used for redistribution).

If not, it will proceed to the second sequence of the route-map (which happens to be a deny all entry, since no match statement is used in conjunction with a deny type), and the route will not be redistributed.

HTH,

Rob

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Correct Answer
Robert Taylor Tue, 07/13/2010 - 10:14

Each route-map can have multiple sequences to it, which dictate the order by which you move through a route-map.

Once the item (packet, route prefix, etc) being sent through the route-map finds a matching statement, it will take the action dicated in that specific sequence, and then immediately exit the route-map.

For example, in this route-map:

route-map eigrp-bgp-rm permit 10
match ip address  eigrp-bgp
!
route-map eigrp-bgp-rm deny 20

If a route DOES match the "eigrp-bgp" access-list, then it will be allowed (this route-map is probably used for redistribution).

If not, it will proceed to the second sequence of the route-map (which happens to be a deny all entry, since no match statement is used in conjunction with a deny type), and the route will not be redistributed.

HTH,

Rob

Kevin Melton Tue, 07/13/2010 - 11:54

Rob

Thanks for the detailed explanation.  It is a big help and makes it crystal clear.

Kevin

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