Need explaination on "show policy-map interface" commands on 4500 and 3560 switches

Answered Question
Jul 29th, 2010
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I have numerous 10 and 100 meg links (WAN/MAN circuits) connecting remote locations(3560's) to a core switch(4507)..I have configured policy maps to support QoS for voice (nope, none Cisco VoIP). I want to see that my policy-maps are being applied/hit/used/functional at both the 4507 and 3560 switches. On any of my 4506 or 4507 switches, I see that the policy-map "has data or packet matches".    On any of the 3560 switches, I see no data or packet matches when entering the show policy-map interface command. I am using access-lists for the class-map section in both 4500 and 3560's. The 4500's show "hits/logs" but the 3560's do not. See the output from both the 4507 and 3560 switches. My 4500 switches vary slightly from an IOS perspective as well as the 3560's. Can anyone explain this?

4507R#sh policy-map interface

GigabitEthernet4/2

  Service-policy input: QoS-Policy-VoIP-10meg-WAN

    Class-map: VoIP-RTP (match-all)
      79161937 packets
      Match: access-group 110
      police: Per-interface
        Conform: 1116689014 bytes Exceed: 0 bytes


    Class-map: VoIP-Control (match-all)
      40337 packets
      Match: access-group 111
      police: Per-interface
        Conform: 83515 bytes Exceed: 0 bytes


    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      5510079552 packets
      Match: any


3560-1#show policy-map interface
FastEthernet0/1

  Service-policy input: QoS-Policy-VoIP-10meg-WAN

    Class-map: VoIP-RTP (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
       offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: access-group 110

    Class-map: VoIP-Control (match-all)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
       offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: access-group 111

    Class-map: class-default (match-any)
      0 packets, 0 bytes
       offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
      Match: any
        0 packets, 0 bytes
         rate 0 bps

Correct Answer by rgodden about 6 years 8 months ago

Coz on the 3560 Cisco have never fully implemeted the

policy  map to show any meaningful output, which when you use a Voip

policy to restrict the number of calls on a port is just great.

Come in Cisco pull your fingers out, the product isnt new so there is no excuse.

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Correct Answer
rgodden Thu, 07/29/2010 - 15:26
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Coz on the 3560 Cisco have never fully implemeted the

policy  map to show any meaningful output, which when you use a Voip

policy to restrict the number of calls on a port is just great.

Come in Cisco pull your fingers out, the product isnt new so there is no excuse.

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