CDP Neighbor question

Answered Question
Aug 6th, 2010

Hello All,

A friend came to me asking a question regarding the output below, but given my novice level I have been unable to help.  Below is the sh cdp neighbor command from a Cisco 3550 Switch that is connected to a Cisco 2821 router.  The question is what do the decimal point after Gig 0/1 signify?  For instance, Gig 0/1.8?  Also, why would someone have a setup of using the same interface three times?  Thanks for any assistance.

Device ID        Local Intrfce     Holdtme    Capability  Platform  Port ID
KYX-Admin02      Gig 0/2            176         T S       WS-C2924M-Gig 1/1
KCn                    Fas 0/4            121        R S I      Cisco 2821Gig 0/1.68
KCn                    Fas 0/4            121        R S I      Cisco 2821Gig 0/1.8
KCn                    Fas 0/4            131        R S I      Cisco 2821Gig 0/1
KCn                    Fas 0/2            131        R S I      Cisco 2821Gig 0/0

I have this problem too.
0 votes
Correct Answer by Tharak Abraham about 6 years 4 months ago

Andrew,

The best way to understand why the same interface is used multiple times is to look at the legacy way of intervlan routing called "Router on a switch"

The link below would help ya..

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/tech/tk389/tk815/technologies_configuration_example09186a00800949fd.shtml

Correct Answer by Jon Marshall about 6 years 4 months ago

Just to add to Jerry's post.

The 3550 is a L3 switch so you don't actually need to use subinterfaces on the router. In fact by using subinterfaces on the router you are limiting the bandwidth available between those vlans.

In the majority of cases if you have a L3 capable switch then the inter-vlan routing should be done there and not using subinterfaces on a router.

Jon

Correct Answer by Jerry Ye about 6 years 4 months ago

Subinterfaces and use the router to route between VLAN's.

HTH,

jerry

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Overall Rating: 5 (3 ratings)
Loading.
Correct Answer
Jerry Ye Fri, 08/06/2010 - 13:25

Subinterfaces and use the router to route between VLAN's.

HTH,

jerry

Correct Answer
Jon Marshall Fri, 08/06/2010 - 15:39

Just to add to Jerry's post.

The 3550 is a L3 switch so you don't actually need to use subinterfaces on the router. In fact by using subinterfaces on the router you are limiting the bandwidth available between those vlans.

In the majority of cases if you have a L3 capable switch then the inter-vlan routing should be done there and not using subinterfaces on a router.

Jon

Andrew Lutz Sat, 08/07/2010 - 11:18

Thanks a lot to everyone.  I will definitely take a look at that link.  Thanks again.

Actions

This Discussion