remote branch design...

Unanswered Question
Aug 30th, 2010

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From a design point of view, would it be best to the switch operate as layer 3? I want the switch to share the load with the router. The site usually has 50 concurrent connections.

What would be best option?

Many thanks

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Richard Burts Mon, 08/30/2010 - 09:57

With a branch size of about 50 I think it will not make a significant difference. The diagram shows 2 access layer switches connected to a single distribution layer switch. In that situation I believe that it is best if the distribution switch is a layer 3 switch and is doing routing for inter vlan communication. In this way the layer 3 switch carries responsibility for routing within the branch and the router is able to focus on routing for outside of the branch.

HTH

Rick

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