CVP available port license

Answered Question
Oct 4th, 2010
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Hi,


How to check CVP 7.0 available port license. we have purchase 100 port license and already uploaded the license fle but want to check how much port availabe for use.


kindly help me.


Thanks & Regards,

Muzammel Haque

Don't confuse licencing with implementation. This is a little complicated.


When the design was done, the integrator (CVP ATP partner) would have specified estimates that were used as input into the IVR Calculator or the CVP calculator. These consider the various types of calls you receive and calculates the number of VXML licenced ports you need. This is a licencing calculation, and the A2Q team will examine the way this has been done, check the calculations, and confirm that you have bought sufficient VXML port licences.


But those licences are not necessarily used.


There are three types of calls.


1. self-service calls

2. calls that enter the IVR for a short time, accessing a menu system or a more complex IVR app, and then are queued to agents

3. calls that come in without needing any IVR treatment and are queued to agents.


(sometimes there are no #3 calls; sometimes there are no #1 calls; and sometimes there are no #2 calls)


Let us assume for each type of call you know the BHCA (Busy Hour Call Arrival rate) and the average time in the IVR.


Clearly in 1, calls don't go to agents so that's all you need for the calculation. For 2 and 3, you need the average time in the menu system (this is zero for 3), and the number of agents. If you have all the input data, you can run the IVR Calculator and come up with the total number of IVR ports required (for 1 and 2) and the total number of queue ports required (2 and 3).


When you add these up, you have the total number of licenced ports you are required to buy, as specified in the CCBU Ordering Guide. This will be reviewed by the A2Q team. You also have the option of buying redundant ports up to the number of VXML ports you have ordered.


The Call Server will be licenced by Cisco for 1000 call server ports. This exceeds the capacity a Call Server is allowed to have, but the CVP Calculator will tell you how many Call Servers you need - varies for SIP and H.323, average number of microapp prompts (script complexity) and so on. Again, the A2Q team will check your calculations on the number of Call Servers needed.


Now that the system is licenced correctly, your options for implementation come into action. Now we have a different story.


You could, if you were capable, build a complete system with self-service, a menu system, and queuing strategy all in microapps. You would use zero CVP VXML ports. This is perfectly fine. Your capacity is high, way higher than you need. If the BHCA or other parameters change radically, you would be obliged to buy more licences for CVP VXML ports under the Cisco agreement, even though you are not actually using any.


The normal implementation is to build your self-service application in CVP Studio and deploy it, and this uses your VXML ports. status.bat will show the usage at any point in time. In addition to a VXML port, each call will use 1 Call Server port for the life of the call (the switch leg) and 1 Call Server port for the VRU leg. But you have plenty so they are not normally considered, but they are being used.


The menu system can be built in CVP Studio or you can build it with microapps. Or you can mix and match, building simple prompters with microapps, going into a Studio app to talk to a back end system, coming back to microapps and so on. The queuing is normally done with microapps.


As above, while the call is in the IVR, whether being treated or being queued, two Call Server ports are being used. Once the call is deflected to an agent, only 1 Call Server port is being used. If your application was built in Studio, you also will be using a CVP VXML port while the call is in the IVR application, but once the call is being queued in microapps, you are no longer using this licenced VXML port.


The point of all this is to say that you are licenced to serve 100 concurrent calls in either self-service or queuing in the IVR, but whether you are actually using 100 CVP VXML ports when this is the situation depends on the implementation.


At this stage you have licenced your VXML servers. You also need to licence all the Call Servers you have. Hitesh explained how you should check that with the CVP Diagnostic Applet.


Then you are good to go.


Regards,

Geoff

Correct Answer by hiteshpa about 6 years 9 months ago

Geoff,


Please read his question:

" How to check CVP 7.0 available port license. we have purchase 100 port license and already uploaded the license file but want to check how much port availabe for use."



As far as I can tell, Muzammel wants to know how many ports are available for use. The status.bat file will show him that.



I will let Muzammel comment on how effective my response was.



Thanks,


Hitesh Patel

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hiteshpa Mon, 10/04/2010 - 06:18
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Based on the number of ports you have listed, I am assuming you are asking about CVP VXML license ports. On the VXML server, browse to "\Cisco\CVP\VXMLServer\admin" and run the "status.bat" file. This will show you the number of ports.


If you are inquiring about CVP call server license, open this webpage: "http://localhost:8000/CVP/diag" to see the number of ports


Thanks,


Hitesh Patel


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On the VXML server, browse to "\Cisco\CVP\VXMLServer\admin" and run the "status.bat" file. This will show you the number of ports.



That's not very useful advice - he knows it's 100 since that's what he bought.


What you need to do is look at the call log (Global Call Logger).


Every caller who enters the system and starts a session writes an entry in the call log. It shows what application they are running, but for your purposes, the most important thing is it also shows the number of concurrent users in the system at the time the caller enters. It's a comma-separated file. A little Unix magic with cut and sort will find the greatest value. Alternatively, feed it into an excel spreadsheet and sort by column.



Regards,

Geoff

Correct Answer
hiteshpa Mon, 10/04/2010 - 09:38
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  • Cisco Employee,

Geoff,


Please read his question:

" How to check CVP 7.0 available port license. we have purchase 100 port license and already uploaded the license file but want to check how much port availabe for use."



As far as I can tell, Muzammel wants to know how many ports are available for use. The status.bat file will show him that.



I will let Muzammel comment on how effective my response was.



Thanks,


Hitesh Patel

haquemuzammel Mon, 10/04/2010 - 23:23
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Hi Hitesh,


You are right. As I know there is no concept of VXML and queue license for CVP 7.0. The only licenses are CVP port license and redundant license. Port license for self-service and queue both. So we bought 100 CVP (CVP-7.X-PTS) port license and 100 CVP redundant port license. so as per my understanding these 100 port license will be work for vxml as well as queue. we have collected the license file from cisco and already uploded.


In this stage I want to know that is my CVP is ready to serve 100 port concurrently (including self-service and queue) or not.


hope it will clearify.



Thanks & Regards,

Muzammel Haque  

Correct Answer

Don't confuse licencing with implementation. This is a little complicated.


When the design was done, the integrator (CVP ATP partner) would have specified estimates that were used as input into the IVR Calculator or the CVP calculator. These consider the various types of calls you receive and calculates the number of VXML licenced ports you need. This is a licencing calculation, and the A2Q team will examine the way this has been done, check the calculations, and confirm that you have bought sufficient VXML port licences.


But those licences are not necessarily used.


There are three types of calls.


1. self-service calls

2. calls that enter the IVR for a short time, accessing a menu system or a more complex IVR app, and then are queued to agents

3. calls that come in without needing any IVR treatment and are queued to agents.


(sometimes there are no #3 calls; sometimes there are no #1 calls; and sometimes there are no #2 calls)


Let us assume for each type of call you know the BHCA (Busy Hour Call Arrival rate) and the average time in the IVR.


Clearly in 1, calls don't go to agents so that's all you need for the calculation. For 2 and 3, you need the average time in the menu system (this is zero for 3), and the number of agents. If you have all the input data, you can run the IVR Calculator and come up with the total number of IVR ports required (for 1 and 2) and the total number of queue ports required (2 and 3).


When you add these up, you have the total number of licenced ports you are required to buy, as specified in the CCBU Ordering Guide. This will be reviewed by the A2Q team. You also have the option of buying redundant ports up to the number of VXML ports you have ordered.


The Call Server will be licenced by Cisco for 1000 call server ports. This exceeds the capacity a Call Server is allowed to have, but the CVP Calculator will tell you how many Call Servers you need - varies for SIP and H.323, average number of microapp prompts (script complexity) and so on. Again, the A2Q team will check your calculations on the number of Call Servers needed.


Now that the system is licenced correctly, your options for implementation come into action. Now we have a different story.


You could, if you were capable, build a complete system with self-service, a menu system, and queuing strategy all in microapps. You would use zero CVP VXML ports. This is perfectly fine. Your capacity is high, way higher than you need. If the BHCA or other parameters change radically, you would be obliged to buy more licences for CVP VXML ports under the Cisco agreement, even though you are not actually using any.


The normal implementation is to build your self-service application in CVP Studio and deploy it, and this uses your VXML ports. status.bat will show the usage at any point in time. In addition to a VXML port, each call will use 1 Call Server port for the life of the call (the switch leg) and 1 Call Server port for the VRU leg. But you have plenty so they are not normally considered, but they are being used.


The menu system can be built in CVP Studio or you can build it with microapps. Or you can mix and match, building simple prompters with microapps, going into a Studio app to talk to a back end system, coming back to microapps and so on. The queuing is normally done with microapps.


As above, while the call is in the IVR, whether being treated or being queued, two Call Server ports are being used. Once the call is deflected to an agent, only 1 Call Server port is being used. If your application was built in Studio, you also will be using a CVP VXML port while the call is in the IVR application, but once the call is being queued in microapps, you are no longer using this licenced VXML port.


The point of all this is to say that you are licenced to serve 100 concurrent calls in either self-service or queuing in the IVR, but whether you are actually using 100 CVP VXML ports when this is the situation depends on the implementation.


At this stage you have licenced your VXML servers. You also need to licence all the Call Servers you have. Hitesh explained how you should check that with the CVP Diagnostic Applet.


Then you are good to go.


Regards,

Geoff

haquemuzammel Tue, 10/05/2010 - 22:50
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Geoff,


Thank you for your nice explanation. We have completed all the activities you mentioned including design before purchasing the product from Cisco. The Contact Center is in deployment stage and waiting for launch. In our deployment menu system built by mix and match, simple prompters with microapps, going into a Studio app to talk to a back end system, coming back to microapps and so on. We have bought 100 port licenses to serve the customer for self-service and queuing.

Below are major product part number those we bought:

1. CVP-7.X-----------------------------1 Qty

2. CVP-7X-PTS-----------------------100 Qty

3. CVP-7X-REDPT-------------------100 Qty

4. CVP-70-SERVER-SW-----------2 Qty

Based on the above which license we can get  from Cisco? As per my understanding, we can get 4 license file.

(1). two for Call server license (one priamry and one for redundant server).

(2). two license file for vxml (one priamry and one for redundant server).

But we got only two license file and after uploaded both call server is showing 2000 port available and vxml showing only two port available mean no vxml license uploaded.

Please confirm me that my understanding is correct or not and we can get vxml license file against the part number CVP-7X-PTS so that we can request cisco for the vxml license file.

Thanks & Regards,

Muzammel Haque

I may have described the Call Server ports incorrectly. There are two legs to the call - the switch leg, and the VRU leg. But maybe only one Call Server port is used. I'll have to run some tests tomorrow and get back.


Based on the above which license we can get  from Cisco? As per my understanding, we can get 4 license file.

(1). two for Call server license (one priamry and one for redundant server).

(2). two license file for vxml (one priamry and one for redundant server).


Your Call Servers would both be active - not primary/redundant. Your SIP proxy will round-robin between the Call Servers.


Yes, you must have 4 licences. You have the Call Server licences, licenced by MAC address.


Please confirm me that my understanding is correct or not and we can get vxml license file against the part number CVP-7X-PTS so that we can request cisco for the vxml license file.


The fact that you are showing 2 VXML ports means you have the demo licence that it comes with out of the box.



The PAK (Product Activation Key) that came on the piece of paper with the product enables you to go to the Cisco Licencing Site and order the VXML licences you need. You would need the system IDs that you get from the boxes by using the Ops Console. You will do this twice, first for the primary and then for the redundant ports. When you go there and put in your PAK, it will show 200 ports. Choose 100 and the enter the first system ID, and it will send you the first licence via email. Now there will 100 left. Enter the second system ID and 100 ports and it will send the second licence. Deploy appropriately and restart.


Now check with status.bat.


I now understand why you asked your question.


Regards,

Geoff

valiegenus Wed, 10/06/2010 - 03:17
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Geoff,

I think there are two Perspectives:

1-Sizing Perspective:
From sizing perspective you just add the Self Services to agents.and from this base you can chose which server HW sepcifications that meet your needs
2-reporting perspective:
As you know each call on the CVP has 2 call legs (Type 2 and Type 7). For all IVR calls when the call is running on the system you have from reporting perspective 2 sessions. When the call is transferred to the agent, from routing client perspective there is only the type 7 leg remaining. SO from reporting perspective you have the number of ports on IVR multiplied by 2 adding to it the number of active agents (Talking).

Regards

I may have described the Call Server ports incorrectly. There are two legs to the call - the switch leg, and the VRU leg. But maybe only one Call Server port is used. I'll have to run some tests tomorrow and get back


I have been doing some tests with CVP Comprehensive and watching the Call Server ports in use from the Diagnostic Servlet. I only see one Call Server port being used when the call is in the VRU, not two. My mistake.


Regards,

Geoff

Hitesh,


As far as I can tell, Muzammel wants to know how many ports are available for use. The status.bat file will show him that.


When the 100 port licence is correctly installed, status.bat will show 100 licenced ports.


If there are 60 callers currently in all his applications when status.bat is run, status.bat will also tell you that; and it will show you which applications they are executing at that moment in time. The number of ports available for use at that time is therefore 100 - 60 = 40.


Since one does not know whether or not the time of execution of status.bat represents the highest port usage during the day, status.bat is not useful to assess the high-water mark. Only by analyzing the call log will one find the high-water mark.


I will let Muzammel comment on how effective my response was.


I write for the wider audience.


Regards,

Geoff

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