"Recommended WAN Access Speed"

Answered Question
Oct 4th, 2010
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Hi,


I'm hoping someone can explain something for me:


I'm currently looking at the Cisco ISR Router ranges for a new branch site on a clients network. Now this isn't something that I do every day, so I figured I'd check up on the specs of the devices in the range to see what's the best fit...


From looking at the following Cisco PDF:


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps10536/Routing_Poster.pdf

I have a question with regards to the "Recommended WAN Access Speed". Can anyone clarify how exact this value is and if anyone has experience of going outside this value..

Our client is looking at having a 100Mbps IPVPN link (plus internet) which will be used to connect approx 100 staff to a central datacenter where their Terminal Servers are located.

The problem that I have is that this is a new office, which will take staff from approx 5 smaller offices and combine them togehter in a single location. Due to this, getting an idea of actual bandwidth usage is tricky... (not helped by the client being a little bit vague on what they actually intend to host on the new site)..

So, from the PDF - for a recommended WAN Access Speed of 100Mbps, the suggestion is a 3925 Router or above.. However I'm thinking that maybe this is a bit "over the top"...

Any comments/suggestions etc... on how I can fit the correct device for the customer would be much apprecitated.

Correct Answer by vmiller about 6 years 5 months ago

One place you could start is what do the clients use for applications right now ?

This would establish some sort of rough baseline. It does sound like your client is

migrating to a citrix solution, so the proposed link speed is not out of line.


It does sound like your customer has some expectations already, I'd be somewhat

cautious at low balling the bandwidth. I would consider getting pricing on the 100 Mb,

then the next one slower, and the next one higher. Keep in mind if you go too low,

reprovisioning can be time consuming.


The WAN access speeds you are referring to are based on the assumption of additonal

services available via WAN link, such as Video, Lots of Internet, maybe some Telepresence.

I wouldn't consider it exact in the engineering sense

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Correct Answer
vmiller Mon, 10/04/2010 - 07:46
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One place you could start is what do the clients use for applications right now ?

This would establish some sort of rough baseline. It does sound like your client is

migrating to a citrix solution, so the proposed link speed is not out of line.


It does sound like your customer has some expectations already, I'd be somewhat

cautious at low balling the bandwidth. I would consider getting pricing on the 100 Mb,

then the next one slower, and the next one higher. Keep in mind if you go too low,

reprovisioning can be time consuming.


The WAN access speeds you are referring to are based on the assumption of additonal

services available via WAN link, such as Video, Lots of Internet, maybe some Telepresence.

I wouldn't consider it exact in the engineering sense

jvankoningsveld Sun, 10/10/2010 - 11:51
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Thanks vmiller.


I'm planning on getting a meeting sorted out with the customer to discuss this in more details - so I'll take your advice and try and push them for some more info on their future requirements.


I've also had some confirmation on plain routing speeds from our supplier, so hopefully that will help me make my decision.


Thanks again for your advice, it's much appreciated.

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