3750G48 Vs 2960G

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Oct 6th, 2011

We use 2960G as a backbone switch. We are going to upgrade 3750G. Because of we need high speed back plane for data intensive application. May I know about pros n cons?

I have this problem too.
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SunilKhanna Fri, 10/07/2011 - 00:06

Hi,

All 3750 supports stacking feature. The decision of upgrade from A to B is more a feature requirement, rather than comparing the two box's/.

here is a small list of featues available on the two switches.

Catalyst 3750, 3560 and 2960

Regards,

Sunil

yezawkhant Fri, 10/07/2011 - 21:25

Thank you for sharing, Sunil. Indeed I do not need most of the 3750 features such as power management, layer 3 capabilities. I just need the faster performance for my access layer and backbone switches. i.e 48Gbps back plane for 48 Gigabit ports.

JosephDoherty Fri, 10/07/2011 - 03:05

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Posting

I recall (?) the 3750G backbone is only 32 Gbps, and it's forwarding rate won't always support even that.  This might not be any better than the 2960G.

If you really need higher performance, look at the current generation 3750X, basically wire-speed.

If you don't need stacking, other options are the 3560X and the 4900.  Also note, the stack ring of a 3750 or 3750E/X can become a bottleneck too.

Lastly, I recall (?) the latest gen of 2960S might be wire-speed.

yezawkhant Fri, 10/07/2011 - 21:37

Much thanks to you, Joseph.

We can achieve 32Gbps from stackwise feature. Am I correct?

I thought 3750X is specialized for fiber interface before. Sure, I'll look into this.

In fact we do not need stacking and if i m not wrong 3560 is going to EOL.That's why we consider the 3750G.

If we can have the real wire-speed, I'll choose cheaper 2960S.

Because I just want to improve the backplane speed for the access layer and backbone switch.

(i.e 48Gbps backplane for 48Gigabit port switch.)

Again, thank you.

JosephDoherty Sat, 10/08/2011 - 05:28

Disclaimer

The      Author of this posting offers the information contained within this      posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding   that    there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any    purpose.   Information provided is for informational purposes only  and   should not   be construed as rendering professional advice of any  kind.   Usage of  this  posting's information is solely at reader's own  risk.

Liability Disclaimer

In      no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever    (including,   without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or    profit) arising  out  of the use or inability to use the posting's    information even if  Author  has been advised of the possibility of   such  damage.

Posting

"We can achieve 32Gbps from stackwise feature. Am I correct?"

Yes and no.  The 32 Gbps Stackwise is two 8 Gbps duplex connections.  Original Stackwise floods everything on all switches across the ring and it's the sender that removes the frames.  Not an optimal design for high performance, such as in a core.  This architecture is sort of similar to an internal bus.

The newer Stackwise+, found on the 3750(E/X) uses two 16 Gbps duplex connections (AKA 64 Gbps).  Only unicast packets that are not local to the sending switch are placed on the ring.  The destination switch removes frames.  This architecture is sort of similar to Token Ring (w/o a token).

"Because I just want to improve the backplane speed for the access layer and backbone switch.

(i.e 48Gbps backplane for 48Gigabit port switch.)"

Typically, fabrics are given as 2x the port nominal bandwidths.  I.e., for 48 Gig ports you would want a fabric specification of 96 Gbps.  This because modern ports are almost always duplex.

For the 2960 series their performance specs are documented in Table 4 in:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/switches/ps5718/ps6406/product_data_sheet0900aecd80322c0c.html

Leo Laohoo Fri, 10/07/2011 - 21:27

Just what are you looking for?

What kind of servers?  How many servers?  We need more information because what you are disclosing is very simple. 

yezawkhant Fri, 10/07/2011 - 21:52

Hi Leo,

I just want to improve my switching layer performance.

Mostly MS Windows 2000 ~ 2008 Server(32/64) and Ubuntus.

Multiple application servers and MS SQL servers.

Less than 15 and only 3 servers in the DMZ.

Thanks and rgds,

Y Z

Leo Laohoo Fri, 10/07/2011 - 22:23

1.  3560/3560G isn't going EoL, yet.

2.   What's your budget?  If you have more than 2 3750X switches in a stack then it's cheaper just to get a 4510 with Sup7E.

You want fibre support?  All the 3750X can support up to 4 1Gb SFP or 2 10Gb SFP+ or a combo of 1 10Gb SFP+ and 2  1 Gb SFP.  If you want more then 3750X-12S or 3750X-24S will fit the bill. 

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