Extended Ping Testing

Unanswered Question
Jan 13th, 2012

Network

                        2 Bundled T1(3Mbps)

2911---------------------------------------------------------2911

I am pinging across the Wan to test the circuit and it is pinging fine with the default extended ping 5 repeat count and 100 Datagram size. I was told that I need to up the repeat count to 1000 and the datagram size to 17999 to test the line. Also when performing this test Txload is 255/255.

Is this really needed to test the load on the line, that big of a datagram size?

Thanks!

I have this problem too.
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lgijssel Fri, 01/13/2012 - 05:56

IMHO ping tests are never a good solution to test network throughput. And certainly not when performing them from the router or switch. Reasons for this are:

1: ICMP is often processed from the control plane and will hence provide an incorrect picture of the actual performance. The TCP/UDP performance using CEF is generally much better.

2: In MPLS networks, providers sometimes configure ICMP throttling. The result of this can be that one gets the incorrect impression that the link has packet loss.

The best way to test is using a special application like iPerf/Jperf (poor man's solution) or Chariot for the more established ones. When you want accurate results, it is obvious that such tests should not be run between network devices but rather among powerful servers or workstations. Linux is better suited for this purpose because it delivers higher (and more constant) performance than Windows.

Naturally such a test is more difficult to set up but testing from the switch or router really doesn't tell you much more than whether there is connectivity or not. No conclusions can be drawn from it regarding the performance.

regards,

Leo

desmond.s Fri, 01/13/2012 - 06:10

Thank you very much Leo, great explanation!

It was killing me that I was consistently sending a 1000 packets but only 995 were getting delivered, I thought I should have the ISP test the line to see if it was dirty or something.

Thanks for the help!

rsimoni Fri, 01/13/2012 - 10:31

+1 to Leo's answer.

ping is merely a connectivity tool not a valid performance test.

desmond.s Tue, 01/17/2012 - 09:39

So how would you validate that the line is without issue before putting any devices on it?

I just have a router at the far end and one here onsite and nothing else is connected to it. I mean if its a point to point T1 connection it should not be dropping any packets.

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Posted January 13, 2012 at 5:23 AM
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