×

Warning message

  • Cisco Support Forums is in Read Only mode while the site is being migrated.
  • Cisco Support Forums is in Read Only mode while the site is being migrated.

road map of cisco devices

Unanswered Question
Apr 27th, 2012
User Badges:

Hi Experts


How can i know the life of each Cisco devices like asr 1000 and N7k how long they will stay in the market before end of life end of sale  , i mean life road map for these devices



thanks


Jamil

  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Overall Rating: 4 (2 ratings)
Loading.
paolo bevilacqua Sat, 04/28/2012 - 03:57
User Badges:
  • Super Gold, 25000 points or more
  • Hall of Fame,

    Founding Member

You should contact you local cisco sales office for this kind of talks.

Joseph W. Doherty Sat, 04/28/2012 - 05:19
User Badges:
  • Super Bronze, 10000 points or more

Disclaimer


The   Author of this posting offers the information contained within this   posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that   there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose.   Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not   be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of  this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.


Liability Disclaimer


In   no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including,   without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising  out  of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if  Author  has been advised of the possibility of such damage.


Posting


You really can't know.  Paolo's suggestion is great, but even Cisco doesn't really know.  Reason being so much depends on what's happening in the market, how large is the installed base, new purchasers, how easy it might be to expand hardware features, and what the competitors are doing.


Anything brand new is likely to be around for at least 3 years.  Appliance type platforms (e.g. 3750) tend to have shorter life times, chassis type platforms (e.g. 4500/6500) longer life times.  The latter probably good for at least 5 years. ISR come and go, but 7200s are still available.


Because of the market, some devices die much earlier than I think was planned.  Some live on much longer.  For example, the original 3750 series included a model with a 10 gig port.  The series and its successor series have been around for a while now, but that particular model disappeared in a flash.  Or, there was a 6502 10 gig line card, that came and went so quickly, most probably didn't notice.


On the other extreme, I thought the original 4500 series was going to die like the 5500 series, but the E variants extended their life.


So, again, Paolo's suggestion is great, but whatever Cisco's roadmap is, the market might create unexpected "detours".

paolo bevilacqua Sat, 04/28/2012 - 05:22
User Badges:
  • Super Gold, 25000 points or more
  • Hall of Fame,

    Founding Member

That is all correct.

In fact, when one is sent to have a chat with Cisco directly, is to give them an opportunity to hear things first hand, kind of a reality check if you will.

Actions

This Discussion