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CRS Satori processor

Answered Question
May 4th, 2012
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Hello All,


Do you have any idea abt satori processor in CRS ?


Thanks

sudhir

Correct Answer by charlhug about 5 years 3 months ago

The CRS-PRP is based on a quadcore Intel x86-64 architecture processor, which is much faster than the single-core PPC-architecture processors used in the RP and RP-B and allows for triple-channel DDR3 memory that provides higher capacity and much higher bandwidth. Naturally, this means it's a lot less vulnerable to performance impact from operations requiring CPU time like software-path forwarding or any number of advanced features.


It has a solid state drive, which is faster and more reliable than the spinning disks used previously. Because of this the PRP does not need removable flash cards to boot from, but there's a USB port to still allow for removable storage via flash drives.


Also, the management Ethernet ports now allow SFPs so that you can use fiber connections.


Those are the main differences, but you can look at the pages for the two models and compare to get more detail.

PRP: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps5763/data_sheet_c78-659773.html
RP-B: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps5763/product_data_sheet0900aecd8053b020.html

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mdebraba Fri, 05/04/2012 - 06:24
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This is the codename of the new PRP route processor for CRS.  It is already available.

charlhug Fri, 05/04/2012 - 08:37
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Hi Sudhir,


There's a lot that could be said about the CRS-PRP; could you elaborate on what you would like to know?

Sudhir Kumar Fri, 05/04/2012 - 19:05
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Charles,


I actually want to know the difference between satori processor and previous crs processors ( non satori )


Thanks

Sudhir

Correct Answer
charlhug Fri, 05/18/2012 - 09:10
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The CRS-PRP is based on a quadcore Intel x86-64 architecture processor, which is much faster than the single-core PPC-architecture processors used in the RP and RP-B and allows for triple-channel DDR3 memory that provides higher capacity and much higher bandwidth. Naturally, this means it's a lot less vulnerable to performance impact from operations requiring CPU time like software-path forwarding or any number of advanced features.


It has a solid state drive, which is faster and more reliable than the spinning disks used previously. Because of this the PRP does not need removable flash cards to boot from, but there's a USB port to still allow for removable storage via flash drives.


Also, the management Ethernet ports now allow SFPs so that you can use fiber connections.


Those are the main differences, but you can look at the pages for the two models and compare to get more detail.

PRP: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps5763/data_sheet_c78-659773.html
RP-B: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps5763/product_data_sheet0900aecd8053b020.html

Nicolas Fevrier Thu, 10/04/2012 - 11:18
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Hello Henry,

it's supported for non-owner SDR (when you are carving a logical router), but you can NOT use a DRP in the same owner-SDR than a PRP (for CPU offload / process allocation, for example).

Cheesr,

N.

henrry.huaman Thu, 10/04/2012 - 13:04
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Thanks Nicolas,

We have another doubt:

If The PRP is Intel based and the DRP is PowerPC based, exists any compatibility problem (Intel vs PowerPC)?


BRgds!


Henrry

charlhug Thu, 10/04/2012 - 13:15
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Although the two cards are based on different architectures, CRS "PX" code releases have both PPC and x86 binaries present to provide support for both kinds. As a result, each card is running code for its own architecture including IPC processes that enable it to speak with other cards in the system. There should be no problems with running both of these together.

Nicolas Fevrier Thu, 10/04/2012 - 13:30
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Hello Henry,

you are right, they are running a different code (as Charles mentioned it, both codes are embedded in the -px image), and they are not supposed to communicate, except in some rare migration procedures.

That's why I said it's OK to run it in non-owner-SDR mode. In this case, the DRP is a carved logical router, the line cards are managed by the DRP and we are all good.

But you can not have your DRP in a "regular" (non-carved) router using PRPs and assign processes to it. The DRP will not boot up completely.

Cheers,

N.

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