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Cisco WLC running config

Unanswered Question
May 10th, 2012
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I am trying to get a running config of one of the WLCs in our network but can not find the commands to make this happen. Is there a way to get just the running config off of the WLC in a manner so as to copy and past or tftp it into a WLC? Running ver 5.1.151.0 software on the WLC.

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Amjad Abdullah Mon, 05/14/2012 - 03:00
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With some old versions it was normally
"Show running-config" (I think this is the one used with 5.1 versoin)

However, with later versions it became:

"show run-config commands".


Note please that 5.1 version is not a recommended version. it is advisable to upgrade to one of the latest versions (you need to consider requirements and compatibility first of course to make sure the new version is compatible with your current network devices).


Amjad

Scott Fella Mon, 05/14/2012 - 04:14
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5.x is the worst out there:)  I would upgrade that to at least the 6.x, 7.0 if I were you. 7.2 requires the wism2, 5508, 2504 and certain ap's are not supported on the 7.2.


The show run-config command is one way, but you can also backup your config and open it up in a text editor to see the commands.  The thing you need to understand, is that the order in which it is placed, will not allow you to just cut and paste.  You will have to understand which commands needs to be entered first.  If you tftp the config, it will replace the config you have on the wlc, so make sure it is a full configuration.

jaroddawson Mon, 05/14/2012 - 08:02
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Thanks for thew replies.. I was not aware that the version was so bad. how are the newer versions so much better?  What are some selling points for me to bring it to my PM? Is it interface resolutions or actual configuration bug fixes? Again, thanks for the responce.

Scott Fella Mon, 05/14/2012 - 09:03
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Just search the forum and you will see. That code was just buggy. If you can go up to 7.0.230.0 then that's what I would use.


Thanks,


Scott Fella


Sent from my iPhone

Leo Laohoo Mon, 05/14/2012 - 22:29
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 If you can go up to 7.0.230.0 then that's what I would use.

Use the newer 7.0.235.0.

Amjad Abdullah Mon, 05/14/2012 - 22:35
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Leo:
Although newer are supposed to be better than older, sometimes one should wait for the newer befor accepting it because we don't know what kind of new bugs could be possibly found in new codes.

I was forced to upgrade to 7.0.230.0 due some security risks in 7.0.116.0 that were announced by cisco. or else I would have waited about 6 months or so before agreeing to upgrade to a newer code.

Also, release notes informaiton about caveats are not usually comprehensive to include all open caveats.

Leo Laohoo Tue, 05/15/2012 - 03:08
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Unlike some IOS, I trust this "line" of firmware.  Ever since I've started with the WLC, I've never rolled-back a firmware upgrade.  And I'm also one of the first to run the new firmwares within days of release.


Of course, I read the Release Notes.  

Amjad Abdullah Tue, 05/15/2012 - 03:50
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Thanks Leo for letting us know your experience.
If you remember when 7.0 started, with 7.0.98.0 there were couple of issues and bugs (one of them is internal DHCP not working). They had later to fix this with 7.0.98.218.

This is about 7.0 line.

For 6.0 line, when they issued 6.0.199.0 they tried quickly to issue 6.0.199.4 to fix some very crucial bugs. 6.0.199.0 is now deferred

Leo Laohoo Tue, 05/15/2012 - 15:28
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There is an open debate in regards "to upgrade or not to upgrade, that is the question".


Experience have taught me that if I stay "put", I will find more and more "reasons" not to upgrade.


I agree with what you are saying that every new code introduces more bugs, however, if you turn the table around, every new code also fixes old bugs.  True, I took a "risky" leap by upgrading (4 weeks testing of each code, of course) but I was happy to do it and I got the blessing from management.


Outside the wireless realm, I upgrade the IOS-es of our routers and switches very, very regularly.  One of the greatest benefits is the reduced number of annoying emails from our IT Security telling me "Do you know of this vulnerability BLAH, BLAH, BLAH ... ".  I just replied to their email by saying, "No, I did NOT know about this vulnerability, HOWEVER, I've fixed this issue when we upgraded the IOS of our appliance XXX weeks ago.".


Another benefit is feature set.  So many times have we upgraded our IOS FIRST before being asked (months later) if a feature is available (found only in the recent IOS being loaded).


Ever since I've started with my current job, I have only rolled-back IOS upgrade twice because I did find some bugs.


WARNING:  THIS POST is based entirely upon my own personal opinion and should be taken with a ton of salt. 

Amjad Abdullah Tue, 05/15/2012 - 23:05
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Leo:

You are so right all what you said. Based on your experience you'll choose what suits you and your environment and so do I.

In my case I would postpone upgrade for 2 - 3 months to make sure that there are no critical bugs with the new version and then I upgrade to. I always prefer to be on latest code because if you are too lazy to upgrade and you are satisfied with your current code version, you'll find yourself after sometime running very old version that could possibly be out of support or maybe not compatible with some other products with higher versoins. So always better to be on latest, but as I explained by my experience I won't do the upgrade directly after the new code got released. I prefer to wait for sometime.


Thanks for your experience hints. It will be surely useful for us.


Amjad

Amjad Abdullah Mon, 05/14/2012 - 22:24
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Jarod:


You need also to consider compatibility between the new version and access points you are currently using. Some old access points will work only with older versions and may not work with new versions.


Here is release notes for all versions. you have to carefully read release notes for the version you want to upgrade to and make sure it fits fine with you environment:

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6366/prod_release_notes_list.html


Good luck.


Amjad

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