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3850 Stack Question. I'm new to stacks

Answered Question
Jan 3rd, 2014
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So, I have two 3850's I want to put in a closet.  Do I stack them or just leave them stand alones...  My plan was to connect each to the core switch using fiber and users on each switch.


When I conenct the switches using the stackwise cable, I have an active and standby...  Is there a way to make the standby a member?  is the standby in true "standby" mode?  Can I use the ports on the standby switch?


SO many questions   Apppriecte any help..


Thanks

Correct Answer by Joseph W. Doherty about 3 years 7 months ago

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The  Author of this posting offers the information contained within this  posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that  there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose.  Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not  be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.


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In  no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including,  without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising out  of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if Author  has been advised of the possibility of such damage.


Posting


BTW, when you stack your pair, ideally, you still want an uplink from each switch.  Depending on L2/L3 configuration, on both your stack and core device, you should be able to use the bandwidth from both links to/from the stack too.  Also, if possible, try not to have the two links terminate on same line card on your core device, to avoid that also being a single point of failure.

Correct Answer by Collin Clark about 3 years 7 months ago

You should stack them, you paid a lot for that feature There is a master switch and the rest of the switches are members. There is no standby that's "waiting" like in firewalls. All switches and switchports are active so you can use them all!

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Correct Answer
Collin Clark Fri, 01/03/2014 - 12:05
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  • Purple, 4500 points or more

You should stack them, you paid a lot for that feature There is a master switch and the rest of the switches are members. There is no standby that's "waiting" like in firewalls. All switches and switchports are active so you can use them all!

Correct Answer
Joseph W. Doherty Fri, 01/03/2014 - 12:46
User Badges:
  • Super Bronze, 10000 points or more

Disclaimer


The  Author of this posting offers the information contained within this  posting without consideration and with the reader's understanding that  there's no implied or expressed suitability or fitness for any purpose.  Information provided is for informational purposes only and should not  be construed as rendering professional advice of any kind. Usage of this  posting's information is solely at reader's own risk.


Liability Disclaimer


In  no event shall Author be liable for any damages whatsoever (including,  without limitation, damages for loss of use, data or profit) arising out  of the use or inability to use the posting's information even if Author  has been advised of the possibility of such damage.


Posting


BTW, when you stack your pair, ideally, you still want an uplink from each switch.  Depending on L2/L3 configuration, on both your stack and core device, you should be able to use the bandwidth from both links to/from the stack too.  Also, if possible, try not to have the two links terminate on same line card on your core device, to avoid that also being a single point of failure.

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