gwhuang5398 Fri, 04/21/2006 - 07:14
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Yes you can. It may work better for you if you use the network address and wild card mask in the NAT statement as the source rather than just the host. So if you add hosts to the network, you don't have to change the NAT statement. Use "overload" in that case in the statement.


Hope this helps.


Gary

carl_townshend Fri, 04/21/2006 - 10:44
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we are currently using the overload statement, so if I wanted just one machine to reach the net would I just use the ip that would be on my serial and nat this to an internal address ?

gwhuang5398 Fri, 04/21/2006 - 11:06
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You would nat the internal address to a public IP that is given to your organization, not the IP of the serial interface. The public IP is normally given from your ISP. The IP of the serial interface is usually a /30 address to talk to your carrier's routers.


Gary

carl_townshend Tue, 04/25/2006 - 04:23
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Im with you, so if my serial was say 182.168.1.1, they would normally route another ip to this for example they would route 195.188.1.0/29 etc to me, would they never use the 182.168.1.1 addresses ? and does this only go if you are having more than 1 ip ? becasue at home I have PAT to my serial interface and thats fine, so would nat work at home if I only have 1 machine anyway ?

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