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Recommended destination-pattern for "dial 9 for outside line"

Answered Question
Jan 6th, 2007
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Hi all,


I am curious what the recommended destination-pattern for a "dial 9 to access an outside line" situation is for CME?


A destination-pattern of just "9" works well, but there is a delay while the line is grabbed, so if a user quickly enters 9 and a whole phone number without waiting a second the first couple digits are lost. That also grabs a line before the user enters the whole number. So if a user hits 9, then sits there and thinks, the line is still chewed up even if he does not complete the call.


A destination-pattern of 9....... works great for local calls, because it does not take the line off hook till the full number has been entered.


A destination-pattern of 9........... works great too for long distance numbers, with 1 plus the area code and full number.


However, how would I create a destination-pattern that matches both?


Do most people just set the destination-pattern to be "9" and tell users to wait for the dial tone? Do people set up two sets of dial-peers for local and long distance? That would work, but with eight FXO lines it would make the config much more messy than a single destination-pattern that matches both.


I have tried 9%, but it consumes the first digit I dial after the 9. "9T" works, but unless I set the interdigit timeout very low, the user has a long wait before the call is connected.


So basically I am curious to see what other people use as a destination-pattern for accessing outside lines?


Thanks,


Eric

Correct Answer by Rob Huffman about 10 years 7 months ago

Hi Eric,


Here is what Cisco recommends in the CME SRND Guide;


!11-digit long-distance PSTN dialing with an access code of 9


dial-peer voice 1 pots


preference 1


destination-pattern 91..........


port 2/0:23


forward-digits 11


!


!7-digit local PSTN dialing with an access code of 9


dial-peer voice 4 pots


destination-pattern 9[2-9]......


port 2/0:23


forward-digits 7


From this good design doc;


Cisco Unified CallManager Express Solution Reference Network Design Guide


Cisco Unified CallManager Express Dial Plan


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps4625/products_implementation_design_guide_chapter09186a00805f06ad.html


Hope this helps!

Rob

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Correct Answer
Rob Huffman Sat, 01/06/2007 - 12:09
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Hi Eric,


Here is what Cisco recommends in the CME SRND Guide;


!11-digit long-distance PSTN dialing with an access code of 9


dial-peer voice 1 pots


preference 1


destination-pattern 91..........


port 2/0:23


forward-digits 11


!


!7-digit local PSTN dialing with an access code of 9


dial-peer voice 4 pots


destination-pattern 9[2-9]......


port 2/0:23


forward-digits 7


From this good design doc;


Cisco Unified CallManager Express Solution Reference Network Design Guide


Cisco Unified CallManager Express Dial Plan


http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/sw/voicesw/ps4625/products_implementation_design_guide_chapter09186a00805f06ad.html


Hope this helps!

Rob

emphillips00 Sat, 01/06/2007 - 12:23
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Hi Rob,


Thanks for the link, great document! I am so confused with the dozens and dozens of CME documents with seemingly no organization. I will definitely be bookmarking your link.


You confirmed my thought that I would need two sets of dial peers. Your config works very well.


Thanks a bunch!


-Eric

paolo bevilacqua Sat, 01/06/2007 - 12:36
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May I add to what Rob said and you acknowledged... The more dial-peers, the more control. There is no one-covers-all recipe for this. Do not worry of messing up the config.

Real fun will begin when you will permit users international dialing (pots or voip)... you will discover variable length patterns and timeout ... have fun!

Rob Huffman Sat, 01/06/2007 - 13:05
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Hi Eric,


First off, you are most welcome :) I totally hear you on the documentation scene, its like finding a needle in the haystack! Good luck with your project.


Take care,

Rob

elavoie Fri, 02/09/2007 - 11:23
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You can also instruct your users to press # when they finish to dial !!


Eric

99luckynum9 Tue, 02/01/2011 - 16:17
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The issue of why there is a delay is cause of "T". "T" is known as inter-digit timeout. There are two ways you can fix the delay issue. 1. You can go into telephony-service and change timeout interdigit to a lower value, which I wouldn't do this. I would rather do number 2, which is. First check to make sure that secondary-dial tone in telephony-service is not enabled so do "default secondary-dialtone", then you would want change the destination-pattern in your dial-peer's. I included some direct examples from my configuration below, I removed the port command and a few others for security reasons on my behalf. In basic, for dial-peer 2, example having destination-pattern 9[2-9]......$ means that the ephone has to dial 9 then a number that begins within 2 and 9, now the Area codes and NXX a.ka office number can only begin with 2,3,4,5,6,7,8, or 9. So anyways, example a user dials  92255288 the destionation-pattern will automatically match 92255288 with 9[2-9]......$ because it matches with the wildcards, now there is forward-digits 7. This forward-digits 7 means that is will forward seven digits starting from the right to the left, so 9 would get dropped off from the dialed number so the number that would be passed to the telephony company would be 2255288. The $ sign at the end of the destination-pattern basically means end of dial digit sequence. Now, just so you know some of these destination-patterns I have listen here are overlaid cause I didn't set a preference to each one. Dial peers 2 and 7 are overlaid so you might want to set preference to which one is to be tested first, or you can negate the $ and replace it with the T which would be best. Dial peer 8's destination pattern is for dialing things like *69, *57, etc... You may also want to change max-conn to what ever amount of maximum connections you want, I have mine set to 1 because I am using only one FXO port on a FXO card.


dial-peer voice 2 pots
description 7 digit dial
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 9[2-9]......$
forward-digits 7


dial-peer voice 3 pots
description 3 digit service dial
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 9[2-8]11$
forward-digits 3


dial-peer voice 4 pots
description local operator
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 90$
forward-digits 1


dial-peer voice 5 pots
description long distance dial
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 91[2-9]..[2-9]......$
forward-digits 11


dial-peer voice 6 pots
description 911 emergency service
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 9911$
forward-digits 3


dial-peer voice 7 pots
description 10 digit dial
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 9[2-9]..[2-9]......$
forward-digits 10


dial-peer voice 8 pots
description special service dial
max-conn 1
destination-pattern 9*..$

forward-digits 3

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