How to configure date and time manually on the Access Point

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Jun 22, 2009 5:36 PM
Jun 22nd, 2009

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If no other source of time is available, you can manually configure the time and date after the Access Point (AP) system is restarted. The time remains accurate until the next system restart.

Use manual configuration only as a last resort. If you have an outside source to which the wireless device can synchronize, you do not need to manually set the system clock.

For more information on how to configure the date and time on the AP

Configuring Time and Date Manually:-

If no other source of time is available, you can manually configure the time and date after the system is restarted. The time remains accurate until the next system restart. Cisco recommends that you use manual configuration only as a last resort. If you have an outside source to which the wireless device can synchronize, you do not need to manually set the system clock.

This section contains this configuration information:

•Setting the System Clock

•Displaying the Time and Date Configuration

•Configuring the Time Zone

•Configuring Summer Time (Daylight Saving Time)

Setting the System Clock

If you have an outside source on the network that provides time services, such as an NTP server, you do not need to manually set the system clock.

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to set the system clock:

Command

Purpose

Step 1

clock set hh:mm:ssday month year

or

clock set hh:mm:ssmonth day year

Manually set the system clock using one of these formats:

For hh:mm:ss, specify the time in hours (24-hour format), minutes, and seconds. The time specified is relative to the configured time zone.

For day, specify the day by date in the month.

For month, specify the month by name.

For year, specify the year (no abbreviation).

Step 2

show running-config

Verify your entries.

Step 3

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

This example shows how to manually set the system clock to 1:32 p.m. on July 23, 2001:

AP# clock set 13:32:00 23 July 2001

Displaying the Time and Date Configuration

To display the time and date configuration, use the show clock [detail] privileged EXEC command.

The system clock keeps an authoritative flag that shows whether the time is authoritative (believed to be accurate). If the system clock has been set by a timing source such as NTP, the flag is set. If the time is not authoritative, it is used only for display purposes. Until the clock is authoritative and the authoritative flag is set, the flag prevents peers from synchronizing to the clock when the peers' time is invalid.

The symbol that precedes the show clock display has this meaning:

•*—Time is not authoritative.

•(blank)—Time is authoritative.

•.—Time is authoritative, but NTP is not synchronized.

Configuring the Time Zone

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to manually configure the time zone:

Command

Purpose


Step 1

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2

clock timezone zonehours-offset [minutes-offset]

Set the time zone.

the wireless device keeps internal time in universal time coordinated (UTC), so this command is used only for display purposes and when the time is manually set.

For zone, enter the name of the time zone to be displayed when standard time is in effect. The default is UTC.

For hours-offset, enter the hours offset from UTC.

(Optional) For minutes-offset, enter the minutes offset from UTC.

Step 3

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 4

show running-config

Verify your entries.

Step 5

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

The minutes-offset variable in the clock timezone global configuration command is available for those cases where a local time zone is a percentage of an hour different from UTC. For example, the time zone for some sections of Atlantic Canada (AST) is UTC-3.5, where the 3 means 3 hours and .5 means 50 percent. In this case, the necessary command is clock timezone AST -3 30.

To set the time to UTC, use the no clock timezone global configuration command.

Configuring Summer Time (Daylight Saving Time)

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps to configure summer time (daylight saving time) in areas where it starts and ends on a particular day of the week each year:

Command

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2

clock summer-time zone recurring[week day month hh:mm week day month hh:mm [offset]]

Configure summer time to start and end on the specified days every year.

Summer time is disabled by default. If you specify clock summer-timezone recurring without parameters, the summer time rules default to the United States rules.

For zone, specify the name of the time zone (for example, PDT) to be displayed when summer time is in effect.

(Optional) For week, specify the week of the month (1 to 5 or last).

(Optional) For day, specify the day of the week (Sunday, Monday...).

(Optional) For month, specify the month (January, February...).

(Optional) For hh:mm, specify the time (24-hour format) in hours and minutes.

(Optional) For offset, specify the number of minutes to add during summer time. The default is 60.

Step 3

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 4

show running-config

Verify your entries.

Step 5

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

The first part of the clock summer-time global configuration command specifies when summer time begins, and the second part specifies when it ends. All times are relative to the local time zone. The start time is relative to standard time. The end time is relative to summer time. If the starting month is after the ending month, the system assumes that you are in the southern hemisphere.

This example shows how to specify that summer time starts on the first Sunday in April at 02:00 and ends on the last Sunday in October at 02:00:

AP(config)# clock summer-time PDT recurring 1 Sunday April 2:00 last Sunday October 2:00

Beginning in privileged EXEC mode, follow these steps if summer time in your area does not follow a recurring pattern (configure the exact date and time of the next summer time events):

Command

Purpose

Step 1

configure terminal

Enter global configuration mode.

Step 2

clock summer-time zone date [month date year hh:mm month date year hh:mm [offset]

or

clock summer-time zone date [date month year hh:mm date month year hh:mm [offset]]

Configure summer time to start on the first date and end on the second date.

Summer time is disabled by default.

For zone, specify the name of the time zone (for example, PDT) to be displayed when summer time is in effect.

(Optional) For week, specify the week of the month (1 to 5 orlast).

(Optional) For day, specify the day of the week (Sunday, Monday...).

(Optional) For month, specify the month (January, February...).

(Optional) For hh:mm, specify the time (24-hour format) in hours and minutes.

(Optional) For offset, specify the number of minutes to add during summer time. The default is 60.

Step 3

end

Return to privileged EXEC mode.

Step 4

show running-config

Verify your entries.

Step 5

copy running-config startup-config

(Optional) Save your entries in the configuration file.

The first part of the clock summer-time global configuration command specifies when summer time begins, and the second part specifies when it ends. All times are relative to the local time zone. The start time is relative to standard time. The end time is relative to summer time. If the starting month is after the ending month, the system assumes that you are in the southern hemisphere.

To disable summer time, use the no clock summer-time global configuration command.

This example shows how to set summer time to start on October 12, 2000, at 02:00, and end on April 26, 2001, at 02:00:

AP(config)# clock summer-time pdt date 12 October 2000 2:00 26 April 2001 2:00

Please refer to the Configuring Time and Date Manually section of Administering the Access Point for more details.

If an authoritative time source, such as a radio clock or an atomic clock is available you can use NTP or SNTP to synchronize the time on the AP. For more information on this read How to configure NTP and SNTP on the Cisco AP

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